Ancient history news

Mitanni and Nuzi

Revision of history is rarely mentioned on In the News, mainly as it is a speculative subject. In addition, it is very often a personal creation that may not be in tune with what others have in mind. However, Barry Curnock (author of a couple of articles in SIS journals recently and a speaker at an SIS meeting in Redhill a couple of years ago) has just posted a short paper on Mitanni and Nuzi on the Eric Aitchison chronology thread in which members of SIS interact with each other (and non-members too).

The Dead Sea Scrolls

Is this another important discovery - or rather, interpretation (see http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/07/100727-who-wrote-dead-sea-scrolls/ July 27th. The mystery is solved according to the headline - but is it? New clues suggest the scrolls my have been the textual treasure of a number of groups that were hidden away during a time of war between Jews and Romans.

Exhibition

www.culture24.org.uk June 11th ... Creswell Crags Museum and Education Centre are putting on an exhibition of excavations that have taken place in the limestone gorge and it's caves from Victorian times until the present day. The caves have been used successively by different groups of people for a variety of reasons from Pleistocene hunting bands to medieval monks using it as a hideaway and drinking den.

New Chronology Update May 10th

The New Chronology Yahoo group has a series of emails from Eric Aitchison on reign lengths, and dynasties 18, 19 and 20 in respect of Manetho and other ancient sources. He is arguing that Manetho is more reliable than some forum members are prepared to admit.

Land of Punt

A story in the San Franscisco Chronicle at www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2010/05/-7/MNBN1D3U74.DTL May 8th appears to confirm the Land of Punt was somewhere in the Eritrea/Ethiopia region, a region favoured for some time by historians. To the Pharaohs the Land of Punt was the source of treasure - or prized objects of trade. This included exotic animals such as leopards and baboons.

Iron Age overlap with Bronze Age

Bene Israel: Studies in the Archaeology of Israel and the Levant during the Bronze and Iron ages, Leiden: 2008. This book is dedicated to Israel Finkelstein, archaeologist and teacher, and is a collection of 12 contributions from his former students. It concerns Bronze and Iron age chronology, stylistic pottery peculiarities, land use, resettlement distribution, the formation of states, and economies etc. From a brief look it is clear that some of his students do not agree with Finkelstein's chronology.

God Kings

Anyone interested in an alternative interpretation of Egyptian history, Egyptian texts, Egyptian titles, Egyptian pharaohs - then a visit to www.world-mysteries.com/god_kings_scenario1.htm might satisfy their curiosity.

Troy is in the wrong place?

At http://troyatbergama.blogspot.com there is a new blog devoted to the idea ancient Troy was located not at it's usual location, Hisarlik - but at Bergama, an idea first aired by John Lascelles (a book reviewed by SIS several years ago). There are several pages on the blog for starters - and as blogs develop they grow into many pages (so expect more news on the subject over the coming months). At the moment there is a series of pages that outline the general theory.

Lawrence Dixon and retrocalculation of the Vernal Equinox

Lawrence Dixon has produced a two page article on retrocalculation of the vernal equinox. SIS Workshop has published a series of articles on a revision of dating of the AD period - evidence against and evidence that is open to query. These have tended to centre around the Venerable Bede but the Church and it's calculations of the vernal equinox in relation to Easter dates (keeping them separate from the Jewish Passover) are an intriguing facet of this research. Is the conventional position as secure as they like to think it is?

Horemhab

The New Chronology Forum on Yahoo Groups has had in March a discussion on the reign length of Horemhab. A couple of years ago, in JARCE 44 (2008) wine dockets were said to limit his reign to just 14 years. At the end of the article it says the main obstacle to such a short reign was the Babylonian and Assyrian King List. Bob Porter pointed out the JACF 7 article (1994) also argued for a short reign.