Archaeology news

India

The Hindu April 8th www.thehindu.com/2010/04/08/stories/2010040856602200.htm Indus like inscriptions have been found on South Indian pottery from Thailand (dated between the 2nd century BC and the 3rd century AD) long after the demise of the Indus civilisation.

commercial archaeology

Nature 464 p826-7 (2010) April 8th ... an explosion in commercial archaeology in Britain, ahead of construction projects, has led to a wealth of information that is not necessarily in the public view. Richard Bradley, a professor at Reading University and the author of various books on British prehistory, travelled around the country visiting the offices of contract archaeological teams and local planning officials.

Tell Zeidan

Science Daily April 6th (www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100406133712.htm ) is all about the mound of Tell Zeidan near Raqqa in Syria, close to where the Euphrates branches into two. The site has been abandoned for 6000 years, it is claimed, and as such preserves a society rich in detail as far as trade, copper metallurgy (it dates prior to the Bronze Age) and pottery production is concerned.

Cows Milk

The Observer April 4th (see www.guardian.co.uk/) has a story about cows being the key to human success in Europe. A study of the remains of 20,000 people from the 8th century BC to the 18th century AD has found that during the Roman Empire period our level of nutrition declined - but increased again in the 'dark ages' and the reintroduction of traditional northern European farming with it's emphasis on dairying.

Green Axe

The New York Times (www.nytimes.com March 29th ) has a story taken from the BBC Radio 4 series, 'A History of the World in 100 Objects'. It is striking, it notes, how many objects discussed by the series were symbolic rather than functional. For example, the famous 'gold cape' that was equisitely impractible, or an elaborate bronze bell from 5th century China that could hardly have been used in a practical way. An axe found near Canterbury and roughly 6000 years old was made of polished green jade (or jadeite).

Indus Valley

At www.telegraphindia.com?100406/jsp/others/print.html The Telegraph of India says a study of 100s of Indus Valley civilisation towns and cities have revealed factors previously unsuspected - growth and decline does not show a gradual eastward expansion (from Baluchistan outwards). The study instead showed three epicentres of the civilisation, i) Baluchistan ii) Gujarat, and iii) an ancient channel of the Indus that dried up, located in Haryana and the Punjab.

Userkare Pyramid

At http://news.discovery.com March 30th ... the second pharaoh of dynasty 6, Userkare, does not have a pyramid assigned to him at the present time. However, Guido Magli, a professor of archaeoastronomy in Milan has published evidence in the journal Mediterranean Archaeology and Archaeometry that claims he is able to pinpoint where exactly it should be. Diagonal axes governed the pyramids of Giza, Abirsir and Saqqara - created NE to SW (like the dominant alignment at Stonehenge).

Angkor

At http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-03/teia-dci032910.php tree rings from the Bidoup Nuibos National Park in Vietnam seem to show the fall of the Khmer civilisation coincided with drought - 600 years ago. The empire expanded through a large tract of SE Asia between the 9th and 14th centuries but two severe droughts, with heavy monsoon rains between, may have weakened the empire and it's irrigation system.

Bad Archaeology

Reference the Bad Archaeology web site critique of Velikovsky, James and Rohl - indeed, of any revision or deviation from the orthodox consensus. Bob Porter has confirmed the Psusennes lintel was found outside the tomb of Osorkon II (and not inside as claimed by the Bad Archaeology boys).

Tushan

http://www.daytondailynews.com March 26th ... a brief item on a local Ohio man involved in the discovery and excavation of an ancient Assyrian city at Ziyaret Tepe = Tushan. It was located on the northern border of the Assyrian Empire and flourished between 900-600BC, when it was destroyed by an invading army (tablets record the immanent approach). Several thousand artifacts have been uncovered.