Archaeology news

Userkare Pyramid

At http://news.discovery.com March 30th ... the second pharaoh of dynasty 6, Userkare, does not have a pyramid assigned to him at the present time. However, Guido Magli, a professor of archaeoastronomy in Milan has published evidence in the journal Mediterranean Archaeology and Archaeometry that claims he is able to pinpoint where exactly it should be. Diagonal axes governed the pyramids of Giza, Abirsir and Saqqara - created NE to SW (like the dominant alignment at Stonehenge).

Angkor

At http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-03/teia-dci032910.php tree rings from the Bidoup Nuibos National Park in Vietnam seem to show the fall of the Khmer civilisation coincided with drought - 600 years ago. The empire expanded through a large tract of SE Asia between the 9th and 14th centuries but two severe droughts, with heavy monsoon rains between, may have weakened the empire and it's irrigation system.

Bad Archaeology

Reference the Bad Archaeology web site critique of Velikovsky, James and Rohl - indeed, of any revision or deviation from the orthodox consensus. Bob Porter has confirmed the Psusennes lintel was found outside the tomb of Osorkon II (and not inside as claimed by the Bad Archaeology boys).

Tushan

http://www.daytondailynews.com March 26th ... a brief item on a local Ohio man involved in the discovery and excavation of an ancient Assyrian city at Ziyaret Tepe = Tushan. It was located on the northern border of the Assyrian Empire and flourished between 900-600BC, when it was destroyed by an invading army (tablets record the immanent approach). Several thousand artifacts have been uncovered.

Ancient Wall

http://news.yahoo.com March 22nd ... a source in Greece has announced the discovery of a wall which stood at the entrance to a cave in Thessaly dating back some 23,000 years ago - at the height of the last glacial maximum.

Maya Dynasty

The Times March 20th ... see Register: Archaeology. The Journal of Anthropological Archaeology reports that scientific analysis has shown one of the Maya kings was an outsider. He came and conquered the city of Copan in the 5th century AD - founding a new dynasty that lasted for a further 400 years. The dates here are very interesting, as they coincide with blips in climate - usually manifested by drought in the Maya lands as a result of shifting monsoon patterns of rainfall.

Vikings and Celtic peoples

The Copenhagen Post March 19th (www.cphpost.dk/news/ reports on a Danish analysis of DNA from a Viking cemetery near a 1000 year old church in southern Greenland that shows a strong Celtic bloodline, according to science website www.videnskab.dk . The settlers were Nordic but they had mixed origins - or genes. These were Scandinavian and Celtic (from Britain and Ireland). The colonies in Greenland were first established in AD985 and the skeletons under study date from shortly afterwards.

Boat Mummies

This subject comes up on a regular basis but research by Chinese archaeologists have clarified some issues - but introduced other ideas. The New York Times (see www.nytimes.com March 17th) which begins by describing the location of the dessicated corpses (rather than real mummies) in a desert to the north of Tibet, and tells us that Chinese archaeologists have excavated an extraordinary cemetery - first excavated by Scandinavians some 50 years or so ago and off-limits to westerners for most of the time since then.

The Druid's Arms

www.thisisbristol.co.uk/news/Finding-stones-near-Bristol-place-history/article ... Stanton Drew stone circle may be much older than previously thought due to the discovery of new evidence by amateur archaeologists from a local society, Bath and Camerton. It seems that long before the stone circle was erected around 2500BC there was a long barrow on the site - it's remains are now known as the Cove, three standing stones nestled at the back of the Druid's Arms pub car park.

Horticulture and Agriculture

There is another consensus model under attack. This time the oft repeated claim that plant cultivation made a sudden appearance in the Near East around 10,000 years ago and spread rapidly into Anatolia, the Balkans, through the Mediterranean and across central Europe (in one direction) and into the Indian sub-continent in the other. The spread of farmers into these regions is often integrated with the theory of the spread of language - in both directions. It also affects the way that human genes are being interpreted - in Europe for example.