Biology news

ostrich dinosaurs

 

dinosaurs with feathers and dinosaurs that look like ostriches - see http://phys.org/print365249627.html ... the point of interest ffor Catastrophists here is that the tail feathers and some soft tissuye was preserved. The plumage has been compared with that of an ostrich - and the artist's impression below is extremely ostrich like.

plague

At http://phys.org/print364704390.html ... new research seems to indicate bubonic plague has bedevilled human populations for much longer than consensus has allowed, even as early as the 4th and 3rd millenniums BC (and possibly even earlier when they get to research back further). The migration of people during the Bronze ages has been fingered as one of the culprits.

good co2

The Swiss are innovative. At https://tallbloke.wordpress.com/2015/10/21/co2-capture-plant-to-enhance-... ... the Swiss intend to capture co2 from the atmosphere which will then be used as a greenhouse gas - in real greenhouses. The idea came about as co2 increases the rate of vegetable growth, and market gardening is the ideal place to get rid of the co2 that is captured out of the  air.

fixations

Some people never give up. The idea that huge Pleistocene animals were wiped out by human hunters, small in number and armed with sharp stones attached to wooden spear shafts, refuses to be laid to rest. It has become a many headed hydra. The persistence of the idea speaks volumes - anything but face up to the facts of Catastrophism. At http://popular-archaeology.com/issue/fall-2015/article/shift-in-weaning-... ... but no it does not. It just shows that some mammoth populations were under stress - for any kind of reason.

Ice Age Mammoth Bones

This was sent in by William Thompson - http://news.yahoo.com/ice-mammoth-bones-discovered-michigan-farm/ ... a farmer was installing a drainage system on his property and came across some really big bones. He telephoned the University of Michigan and they sent in a team of 15 palaeontologists and students (of the subject) to excavate the animal. Provisional estimate is the animal was killed between 11700 and 15000 years ago (in the warm period separating the end of the Ice Age from the onset of the Younger Dryas).

Chernobyl

At www.bishop-hill.net/blog/2015/10/6/wildlife-thriving-in-chernobyl.html ... the Chernobyl exclusion zone straddles both sides of the border between Belorussia and the Ukraine. An article in Current Biology seems to show that environmentalists have been telling us porkies once again - and low level radiation is not as dangerous as they make out. This story keeps popping up on the net but it never seems to make it into mainstream media - which says a lot about the latter.

eels and the Gulf Stream

Otto Muck, in his book 'The Secret of Atlantis' Collins:1978, was a catastrophist and though his theory was overtaken by other ideas, on the fate of Atlantis and the expansion of the Atlantic Ocean, he came up with a novel explanation for the behaviour of eels, drifting as larvae on the Gulf Stream with an origin in the Sargasso Sea.

Richard Milton

At www.world-mysteries.com/milton_darwin1.htm ... there is a post on Richard Milton concering Darwinism, as he calls it but what we might call Gradualism or Uniformitarianism (evolution by painstakingly slow processes). He says that debate of Darwinism is forbidden in mainstream media. Alternative theories are discouraged. This is probably a self imposed decision rather than anything sinister as we have the same unwillingness to debate or take on CAGW. Self imposed PC. It is simply never discussed publicly - only on blogs or in articles outside of the reach of mainstream media.

crocodiles

At http://phys.org/print362238625.html ... changing sea levels and global cooling events caused serious declines in the number of crocodiles inhabiting planet Earth at any given time - which really means that the odd catastrophe has periodically reduced their numbers.

dinosaur alaska

William Thompson provided the link, www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/researchers-lost-world-of-dinosaurs-thrived-in... ... I'm not sure if the journalist that did this post was raising a query, with tongue in cheek, or if the author really thought it possible dinosaurs flourished in polar conditions. Whatever, once again we see that consensus doesn't conform with facts.