Climate change news

Climate and the sun

www.nguno/en-gb/Aktuelt/2008/Less-ice-in-the-Arctic-ocean-6000-7000-years-ago/ is an article that dates back to October 2008 but is interesting as raised beaches on the north coast of Greenland are said to suggest ice cover in the Arctic Ocean was greatly reduced some 6000-7000 years ago (Astrid Lysa, a Norwegian geologist, and colleage Eiliv Larsen of the NGU, Norway).

Warming event at 40,000 years ago

www.physorg.com/print196606682.html June 24th ... is an interesting article on a rapid warming event 40,000 years ago, which is well documented in palaeo-climate science sources. However, what caused the warming is a matter of debate and this article disputes an earlier study that claimed methane released from ocean sediments was responsible, the co called 'clothrate gun hypothesis'.

C02 and the Oceans

At www.physorg.com/print196059921.html June 18th ... in looking at ice cores from up to 800,000 years ago scientists have found a link between ice melt and C02 abundance in the atmosphere. There has been a 40 per cent increase of C02 in the atmosphere since the last glaciation - and this can largely be attributed, it is being said, to changes in the circulation of oceanic waters surrounding Antarctica.

Dust in the atmosphere

At www.physorg.com/print195145467.html ... in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences it is being said that dust and pollen in the atmosphere causes higher levels of precipitation in clouds. It is now thought clouds have a greater cooling effect on the weather than previously admitted. This change of tack has come about because of extended research into clouds and their role in global warming.

Second Law of Thermodynamics

At http://scienceofdoom.com/2010/05/08/radiation-basics-and-the-imaginary-second-law-of-thermodynamics/ is the second post at this site concerning sceptic arguments that cite the Second Law of Thermodynamics - usually in a puffed and fillibusting manner. The second law is supposed to contradict global warming, and popped up online and in print at American Thinker, a Republican orientated magazine that very often has some interesting articles.

Ho Hum ...

The blogosphere got a bit agitated the other day when 225 members of the American National Academy of Sciences 'paid' for a letter to be published in Science complaining about victimisation by climate sceptics.

Monsoon Vagaries

At http://calderup.wordpress.com May 5th ... Nigel Calder takes up the article on blips in monsoons in recent history (see earlier post in In the News) that includes some severe famines in India, China, and SE Asia (as previously noted). What he adds to the story are solar influences on the monsoons, based on The Chilling Stars hypothesis.

The Jordan River

At www.physorg.com/print192044027.html May 2nd ... the Jordan river is nowadays little more that a polluted stream a few metres wide that is on the verge of drying up according to environmentalists. Although it is easy to say this is another example of the dripping effect of AGW alarmist stories it is not strictly climate change - but pollution. Mind, they do pull the correct strings as they use Christian pilgrims to milk the apocalyptic tenor of the alarmist preacher.

The Science of Doom

At http://climateaudit.org May 3rd Steve McIntyre tells CA readers to look at the blog Science of Doom (see earlier posts on In the News for this interesting site) at http://scienceofdoom.com . It policy, as Steve notes, unlike that of Real Climate or Climate Progress and other sniffy pro AGW blogs, is not to criticise the heretics (or even pensioners) or use vacuous venom against sceptics, but it is committed to engaging with the general public.

Rainforest regeneration

Will Gosling of the Open University (talk at Aylesbury Museum) says recent research into past climate change in the Amazon basin via ancient pollen preserved in lake sediments, has shown that climate differed in the Ice Ages - and the rainforest was not as extensive as it is now. Pollen analysis also showed the extent of human impact on the rainforest in the 1000 years preceding Columbus - and it was considerable. There are distinct layers of charcoal in lake sediments which appear to denote human activity - as well as evidence humans worked soils (agriculture).