Climate Science in the future

30 Oct 2012

Climate science is increasingly looking at the Sun, the solar wind, and influence of the planets - see http://tallbloke.wordpress.com/2012/10/30/rapid-progress-for-the-solar-p... ... even levels of ozone at the Poles is thought to have a connection with the Sun and the solar wind as they impinge on the earth system - see www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S136468261200140X

Authors such as Solheim, Humlum, and Scafetta are making waves by looking at natural cycles and this appears to be the future of climate science. CAGW climate scientists are being marginalised by the new breed of researcher, and this situation will continue to be more infectious as the temperatures continue to refuse to conform with the models. One of the comments is particularly intriguing. Ian W asks why have extra solar planets been found by the parent star's change in velocity, or it's wobble, if our Sun does not orbit around a barycentre, as the consensus currently claims (providing a comparable wobble). See also www.math.nus.edu.sg/aslaksen/teaching/convex.html

Even sea level calculations are set to be revised as tidal guages and current satellite data have inbuilt problems leading to vastly inflated levels of sea level rise. The current La Nina preponderance in the Pacific, for example, is thought to have led to a global fall in sea levels (La Nina cooling events are now in the ascendance as opposed to El Nino ascendancy in the 1990s and 2000s. There is a good post on the future of sea level measurement at http://wattsupwiththat.com/2012/10/30/finally-jpl-intends-to-get-a-grasp...