Electromagnetism news

The Royals and Electricity in the atmosphere

In 1251 lightning is said to have destroyed the bedchamber of the queen at Windsor and shook the whole house. In the nearby Windsor Forest thirty five trees were split asunder (Matthew Paris, Historia Anglorum). Lightning struck this year too, striking houses and setting them abaze (Weather Eye, The Times). For example, in Wakefield lightning hit a chimney, passed into the loft and then travelled through the central heating system and set the house on fire.

Solar Wind and the Atmosphere

At http://phys.org/print300354398.html ... a paper in Nature Physics shows for the first time, in academic literature, a direct link between solar storms, shock waves and soalar radio bursts. Solar storms were accompanied by solar radio bursts which can cause problems to satellite systems and mobile phone networks. Peter Gallagher, a solar physicist at Trinity College, Dublin, established a radio observatory in Ireland in order to monitor solar radio bursts.

Myth and Plasma events

All is quiet on the blogosphere. People are busy reading and dissecting what the IPCC 5th Report actually says. We've had the political statement - now its time to look at the ingredients. At www.thunderbolts.info/wp/2013/09/22/sunshots/ ... Rens van der Sliujs takes a look at 'sun shooting' in mythology - the idea of an archer firing arrows at the Sun, or a somebody throwing a spear or javelin with the intention of actually hitting the Sun. It all seems incredulous and this is how it has generally been treated by commentators.

The Sun and thunderstorms

This story came out last week, or the week before, and entails the effects of solar wind on thunderstorms and lightning. Stephen Smith has taken up the baton and leads on the story from an Electric Universe slant - see www.thunderbolts.info/wp/2013/09/25/let-it-rain-2/

Fusion ... nearly there

While the politicos have been obsessed with CAGW and combing roof tops of the well to do with solar panels, quietly, and in the background, other scientists have been beavering away - on fusion, and the prospect of cheap power. This may prove to be a life saviour - in more ways than one. At http://phys.org/print299241680.html ... we are transported to the National Ignition Facility in the US. Here, lasers deliver 1.8 megajoules of energy and 500 terrawatts of power - just like that.

Amun. the Ram God

What in the heavens could have given birth to the concept of Amun, the Ram God. SIS member Gary Gilligan suggests the Van Allen Belts may hold a clue - see www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130228155430.htm and www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130922155121.htm

Gary Gilligan's link is www.gks.uk.com/god-amun-aurora/ ... where he explains the connection.

Image, credit NASA and the Goddard Space Flight Centre, and Science Daily

 

 

The big blast in the sky

This is the biggest black hole yet. Feast your eyes. Is it a hole or a blast of energy as light?

The story is at www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblog/2013/09/super-giant-elliptical-galaxy-with...

Plasmoids

At http://phys.org/print298706437.html ... plasma is a hot gas where molecules become ionised - in effect, charged particles. Plasma is abundant in the universe but on Earth is confined to lightning bolts, flames, and aurora. Plasma, in recent years, has been used by industry - plasma reactors for example (yet to become commercially viable), solar cells, flourescent lights, display screens (including TVs), and air tight packaging. It is used in metallurgy, plasma spraying and coating, micro-electronic etching, metal cutting and welding, and in aerospace engineering.

The Electric Sun

SIS member Robert Farrar has sent in an interesting review of Donald Scott's 'The Electric Sun' - which is worth chewing over. Go to http://www.answersingenesis.org/article/arj/v6/n1/plasma-astronomy ... which begins by telling us many creationists have been attracted to plasma astronomy, and after a while it becomes obvious the author is sceptical. He makes a series of specific criticisms of Don Scott's book which is worth reading - if only to get a flavour of what it is the opponents dislike.

Is magnetic north really moving at a rate of knots or is this all down to computer modelling?

Something to chew on here. See for example http://malagabay.wordpress.com/2013/08/03/black-and-white-bloch/ and http://malagabay.wordpress.com/2013/08/06/geomagnetism-virtual-reality-v...

Tim Cullen is not a fan of mainstream geomagnetic science, one of the main props of Plate Tetonics (which is his chief bugbear). He compares it to CAGW science - but is it really as bad as that?