Geology news

Coesite

At https://phys.org/print435394061.html ... international study identifies the process of rock formation by meteor strikes (or nuclear blasts). Nice headline but coesite is a polymath of silica that only forms under extremely high pressure -ten thousand times greated than normal atmospheric pressure. The presence of coesite indicates either that the material has pushed up through earth's crust from the Mantle - or that a comet or meteor struck the site. Lightning bolts as perceived by EU people are not mentioned.

Mega Flints

In the news section (written by Mike Pitts) of British Archaeology magazine (January 2018) we have the discovery of a big piece of flint at Avebury (at a farm) that is one of four described as mega flints (by the archaeologists). One image shows a flint in the lap of a male that is almost as big as his torso. It is basically a core that has been used for flint flakes - but still has lots of possibilities as the material to make lots more stone tools. Its size may indicate it was at one time valued - and may even have been at one time a heirloom.

Chesil Beach

I posted a story on the Chesil Beach a few years ago but now Gary has sent in a link to his web site that some readers may find interesting - go to www.godkingscenario.com/blog/chesil-beach-stones-mars ... I suppose if you take Velikovsky literally when it comes to stones falling out of the sky one might visualise Chesil Beach in Dorset as one such place where they might have landed - but there are an enormous number of stones there. However, this is not to dismiss Gary's article as it has a lot of information about the stones he has gleaned from various sources.

Havre Eruption

Robert sent in this link at https://crev.info/2018/01/hidden-volcano-comes-light/ ... a deep ocean silicic volcano erupted under the waves 5 years ago but hardly anyone noticed. In 2012 the Havre volcano in the Kermradic arc (new Zealand) erupted with rhyolite magma and was only recognised from a pumice raft seen in satellite imagery. Since then mapping, observations, and sampling by submersibles have provided lots of information. The lava came out of at least 14 vents in the ocean floor at depths of 990 and 1220m.

Mount Etna

Robert also sent in this link - go to www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5274051/Mount-Etna-NOT-proper-vo... ... Mount Etna, an Italian geologist claims, is not a real volcano - but a giant hot spring. This is in spite of the molten rock spewed at regular intervals in what is one of Europe's most active volcanoes. However, it is also self evident it produces an  awful lot of water when it erupts - and gases. The source of the water seems to come from water rich deposits inside the Earth - as deep as the Upper Mantle.

Ice on Earth

This is a New Scientist article - go to www.newscientist.com/articles/dn-18949-the-history-of-ice-on-earth.html ... which concerns the history of ice on Earth (according to mainstream theory). Again, another learning exercise that allows us to understand the thinking behind the consensus. We are told our planet has three settings. The first one is the greenhouse - when tropical temperatures extend to the poles and ice sheets vanish.

co2 and Plate Tectonics

At https://cosmosmagazine.com/geoscience/plate-tectonics-the-hidden-key-to-... ... Cosmos is an Australian mainstream science magazine which often has interesting articles on a variety of subjects. In this one it provides an overview of the Plate Tectonics theory - which is worth digesting. It begins with a quote from Carl Sagan, well known to people of a certain generation (the 1960s). Earth lies in the Goldilocks zone - that allows water to exist in a liquid form and the supposition form this is that water allows life to thrive.

Australia Shelf

At https://phys.org/print432201867.html ... the Southern Surveyor research vessal has been looking at the continental shelf system off New South Wales and they have discovered huge underwater landslides close to the shore. They date back hundreds of thousands of years ago (not sure how they arrived at the dates) but presumably earthquake activity was to blame.

    

Hummadruz

The hum has been a subject in Northern Earth magazine for several years - see for example page 25 issue 151, December 2017. At https://phys.org/print431859742.html ... it seems earthquakes can cause the Earth to vibrate for an extended time but in 1998 researchers found the Earth itself generates a low frequency vibrational signal even in the absence of earthquake activity. This has now been extended to the sea floor. Seismometers on land and under the sea have determined the ocean bottom naturally vibrates - a low hum like a wind turbine.

Loch Ness Monster

At https://phys.org/print431945566.html ... geomythology is back in the news. It is still an embryonic science we are told - and has to overcome prejudice and incredulity. It begins with a view over Mount Mazuna, a volcano in Oregon. Native Americans folk tales of its eruption go back 7000 years. Geologists Luigi Piccardi has suggested the Loch Ness monster has something to do with the unusual agitation of the lake's surface water during an earthquake.