Geology news

Ice Sheet Yukon

At https://phys.org/print425033494.html ... in the first paragraph we learn the Mackenzie Trough westwards, including the Yukon part of the continental shelf system, is being researched in order to understand glaciation in north west Canada during the Late Glacial Maximum (and the events that brought it to an end). We are told, 'scientists have had to speculate on the extent and timing of glaciation because they've never been out there with equipment to collect data'.

Great Oxidation Event

Gary sent in this link to www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4895642/Crust-change-billions-ye... ... changesin Earth's crust 2.4 billion years ago increased oxygen levels in the atmosphere and triggered an explosion of life. Oxygen increased 10,000 times over within a period of 200 million years (or that is the estimate in uniformitarian time scales). It sounds like that might need modifying.

big hole in Yakut land

Gary sent in the link to https://www.sciencealert.com/siberia-s-huge-doorway-to-the-underworld-is... carcasses ... Siberian permafrost has been cracking open again, it is said, and one of the craters is growing so rapidly it is uncovering long buried forests and carcasses of dead animals such as musk ox and mammoth.

Hot Spots

At https://phys.org/print422274566.html ... Rice University geophysicists have developed a method that uses the average motion of hot spots to determine how fast plates are moving. Hot spots are thought to lie along plate boundaries - but not universally as some hot spots occur inside plates (rather than at margins). What does this mean?

lithosphere research

At https://phys.org/print421653227.html ... researchers at the University of Southampton have been looking at the thickness of Earth's continents (results published in the journal Science) by using seismic reflections to gain a better understanding of craton boundaries. The Earth's lithosphere includes the oceans, crust, and portions below this, which sit upon the Mantle. The lithosphere includes the continents - but how thick are they? They mkae use of seismic waves generated naturaly by hundreds of earthquakes.

Magnetic stripes

Peter M James has a new article at www.ncgt.org June issue. He has been a long time critic of Plate Tectonics and notes that over the last 50 years there has been a lot of criticism of the hypothesis by geologists, admittedly a minority, but this has had little impact. He adds that critical importance is no doubt related to the fact that the mechanisms involved in the mobilist mainstream model are still of unknown magnitude and/or are taken to act at unknown depths, beyond the gaze of the critics (and the proponents).

Zealandia Research

At https://phys.org/print420432849.html ... scientists are hoping to get a better handle on Zealandia during an exploration that began this week in Australia. As a geologist has said, Zealandia has everything any other land mass has - except it is under the waves. We may assume it was above sea level at one time, particularly pertinent if the geoid had changed in the past. Zealandia extends from south of New Zealand to New Caledonia in the north, and from the Kam Plateau off the coast of Australia to some distance into the Pacific.

dunes under the sea

Gary sent in the following links - www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4707418/Are-tales-legendary-King... .... which concerns a book by a controversial historian who seems to have hit on a way to make money by re-writing history, and www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4697502/NASA-image-reveals-patte... ...--- NASA images show patterns exposed in giant crater. There are a lot of images to look at and digest but what kind of impact was involved - a meteor or an electrical discharge.

Sahara Dust

At https://phys.org/print419683970.html ... geo-scientists have realised dust from the Sahara can play a role in defining Holocene history - and well watered periods of life in the Sahara. A sediment core from Lake Sidi in the Moroccan Atlas Mountains has revealed phases of Sahara dust capture that coincides with arid periods after 12,000 years ago. These are thought to have an origin in dust storms in what is now the Sahara desert and they have been dated at 10,200, 8,200 and between 6600 and 6000 years ago.