Geology news

The hole in the crust

Daily Galaxy December 27th 2009 ... in 2005 an Ethiopian volcano erupted and in the process a 35 mile rift in the landscape was created - in days (instant geology). The writer says, almost off-handedly, that nature appears to make changes much more rapidly than geology allows. However, the uniformitarian model seems to just bob up and down and take these observations on the chin without a flicker.

Pleistocene

www.physorg.com January 12th ... the Black Mesa basin in Arizona has underground aquifers created by seepage through the overlying geology. The water contains gases that provide a hint of ancient climate in the region - via palaeohydrological tools that capture noble gases such as neon and helium, elements that resist normal chemical reactions. Initial results show the aquifer was recharged during the last Ice Age and this implies the Jet Stream at that time was much further south than it is today.

Extra-terrestrial geology from several sources

http://atlas-conferences.com/c/a/j/i/26.htm claims that cosmic activity has been detected in raised bogs in NW Europe and in Siberia (at Tunguska). These traces appear to correspond to episodes of rapid climate change in the Middle and Late Holocene. Lars Franzen of the Earth Sciences Centre at Goteburg in Sweden says raised bogs are an archive of atmospheric deposition in peat over the last 10,000 years (the end of the Younger Dryas Event).

Earth Science Stories

Science Daily, January 21st ... the Kimmeridge Clay deposit is a well known geological formation that runs across middle England - only surfacing at a few points that have been worn down by glaciation but underlying a great swathe of later geological formations. It was deposited in the Late Jurassic between 160 and 145 million years ago and is the main oil source rock in the North Sea. Within the Kimmeridge Clay (which can be seen on Dorset's Jurassic coast and in various quarries) there are divisions, one of which contains many fossils and the other which has none.

Post YD History

Associated Press 29th November 2009 ... the geography department of Northern Michigan University has spent three years on the shoreline of Lake Superior and have been able to define the boundaries as they existed around 2500BC. They found the water at that time was 30 to 40 feet higher than it is today and had features such as shallow water lagoons and enbayments rich in fish and plants.

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