Physics news

Neutrinos ... real or imagined?

David de Hilster, in 'The Neutrinos: Doomed from Inception'  published in the Proceedings of the NPA, College Park, MD 2011, begins by saying some scientists are attracted to the neutrino as it adds desirable characteristics to new theories. However, neutrinos are clearly linked to special relativity. If special relativity is fiction then the neutrino cannot exist. The author, de Hilster, leans on the work of Argentine physicist, Ricardo Carezani.

Little Rascals

Neutrinos are rascally little devils according to Ask a Physicist at http://io9.com/5859576/whats-the-strangest-thing-about-neutrinos/ in reply to a query on why neutrino oscillations occur. At www.thunderbolts.info the actual existence of neutrinos is questioned and the recent experiment in which neutrinos were said to move faster than light involved something going into a mountain  and some shreds of something coming out the other side - but was it neutrinos?

Einstein

A beautiful piece with the title, 'Why Einstein was wrong about being wrong' is at www.physorg.com/print237818552.html and begins with the Theory of Relativity, a mathematical equation, and how it meant the universe was either expanding or contracting. Einstein went on to tweek the theory and adopted the 'cosmological constant' in order to counteract gravity. Some years later Edwin Hubble found the universe was in motion and this led, after some deliberation, to the Big Bang Theory.

Speed of Light

It seems some scientists are worried the general public are not up to understanding what science is all about - and fearful of the way the media presented the hullaballoo over the CERN discovery that neutrinos may travel faster than light - see www.physorg.com/print237470243.html. Sounds a bit like those politicians that have no faith in the democratic process. 

The Speed of Light is also the subject at www.physorg.com/print237460906.html - time dilation is taken into account.

The CERN neutrino experiment ... and Mars

Two weeks since the CERN experiment on neutrinos and some 30 papers in response to the claim they move faster than light have been lodged on the preprint server arXiv - suggesting reasons why the experiment was wrong. At www.thunderbolts.info, however, the actual existence of neutrinos are challenged - but in general neutrinos are accepted by scientists (see www.physorg.com/print237106952.html ). 

That Speed of Light dispute

The subject pops up at www.physorg.com/print236017754.html as it threatens Einstein's 'Relativity Theory' - but as we heard at the last SIS member meeting in Luton, that theory may not be quite as sound as supposed by consensus physicists. Naturally, mainstream scientists are sceptical of the results of the experiment - and so they should be. That is their function. The assumption is that there is something wrong with the experiment rather than with Relativity.

The Higgs Boson ... and faster than light particles found at CERN

At www.physorg.com/print235809985.html it begins by saying the universe would not be the same without the Higgs Boson. The search for this elusive particle would help scientists understand the birth of the universe from the Big Bang. It can explain the speed and magnitude of the expansion ... and there follows an outline of the calculations that were made to arrive at this article of belief.

The CLOUD experiment

theComments on the CLOUD experiment results and a paper in Nature this week, August 25th, are somewhat revealing. Andrew Mountford, author of The Hockey Stick Illusion, at his blog www.bishop-hill.net/blog/2011/8/24/cloud-experiment-links.html sets the tone of the blogosphere flavour by running through some reactions. For example, the internet home of The Team, Real Climate, says the results don't really matter because cosmic ray levels haven't changed, while Nature, hand on heart, says cosmic rays do cause change, but ...

Higgs bosun

Previous upbeat press releases from the CERN laboratory near Geneva have now been superceded by a hint of pessimism - see www.physorg.com/print233217858.html and www.physorg.com/print233249414.html. However, according to research director Sergio Bertolucci, if the Higgs exists the LHC experiments will soon find it. If it does not, its absence will point the way to new physics.

Tides

At www.physorg.com/print231409994.html ... a paper published in the Journal of Geophysical Research (Aug 2011) has been looking at tides in the early to mid Holocene and they have discovered some serious differences with the tides of today. For example, on the east coast of North America tides were 10 to 20 feet high compared with 3 to 6 feet of  today, and tides in the Bay of Fundy, which are now very extreme, at 55 feet, were much less 5000 years ago. At that time tides on the coast of the Carolinas south to Florida were much higher than today.