Physics news

Low Sun activity does not diminish warming effects - so it would seem

At www.nature.com/news/101006/full/news.2010.519.html ... a paper in Nature shows that recent low activity on the surface of the Sun does not correlate with cooling. In fact, the amount of visible light reaching the Earth increased which by itself was a big enough factor to lead to further warming at the surface of the Earth. Lots of people are a bit bemused as it has been the consensus view for some time that low sun spot activity equals cooling weather on earth.

Graphene

At http://calderup.wordpress.com/2010/10/05/with-graphene-carbon-scores-again/ was prompted by the award of the Physics Nobel Prize this year to Geim and Novoselov for their work on graphene. Nigel Calder then lets rip into the field of 'buckyballs' and 'nanotubes' which is all about the potential of carbon as a superconductor resistant to the flow of electric currents.

A step closer to the Big Bang? and creating a black hole in the laboratory

At www.physorg.com/print204957530.html an analysis of what has been happening at the Large Hadron Collider in the last couple of months has been submitted to the Journal of High Energy Physics for publication. Physicists have observed a new phenomenon.

Is our universe in the interior of a giant black hole?

This is another post from Casey Kazan at www.dailygalaxy.com 27th Sept ... a paper available at arxiv.org/abs/1007.0587 'Cosmology in Torsion - an Alternative to Cosmic Inflation' by Nikodem Poplawski, who claims that a small change to the theory of gravity might imply our universe has inherited its arrow of time from the black hole in which it was born. Black holes are the cosmic mothers of new universes is a natural progression from a new and simple assumption about the nature of space time.

Einstein and Gravity

At http://calderup.wordpress.com Sept 24th ... there is a post on General Relativity and Einstein which is a favourite theme of Nigel Calder. In the current issue of Science magazine James Chin-Wen Chou et al detected the well known effects of relativity on the rate of time passing  and at the scale of ordinary human activities. Chou's team used laser light in a pair of aluminium-27 optical clocks to show that time can pass more slowly via the effect of motion on time.

An older universe?

At www.dailygalaxy.com September 20th Casey Kazan stirs the pot by asking, could the universe be older than cosmologists think? More powerful telescopes are upsetting the standard textbook theories - there are seeming contradictions. On of them is the discoveryof a large elliptical galaxy that is very distant and dated, by rred shift analysis, to something like 10 billion years ago.

Have they found something ... or not

At www.physorg.com/print204290256.html ... the official position is that the Large Hadron Collider has found something - but they are a bit shy on saying what it might be. However, the intepretation of what was found was vigorously challenged  during the meeting as scientists bounced suggestions off each other - so who knows?

Parallel universes and the Black Widow

Is gravity from a parallel universe creating dark energy? Casey Kazan at www.dailygalaxy.com has a different slant on a story that emerged a few weeks ago - the idea of gravity leaking from a parallel universe. The commenters at the end of what is a short piece are not impressed. Ivar Nielson of Denmark in particular.

Jupiter's radio emissions and dark energy?

An interesting post by Casey Kazan who continues to rattle the cage at www.dailygalaxy.com and posted on August 31st 'Do Jupiter's radio emissions hint that dark energy may not exist?' ... the cosmic microwave background as tracked by the WMAP satellite shows a pattern of ripples that underpin the idea the universe is composed of dark matter and dark energy. Researchers at Durham Univesity think they have found a flaw in the data - starting with WMAP observations of the planet Jupiter.

sun spots ... can stretch the sky ...

New Scientist August 27th ... sun spots may play a role in small fluctuations in the time it takes the earth to rotate on it's axis. The exact length of the day varies - tides and winds also affect the rotation but now it seems so do sun spots. It is suitably dressed up in uniformitarian glamour wear as they are talking about fractions of a second, supposedly as a result of an abundance of sun spots - or the lack thereof. The question thus might be asked - what hails in the result of a very large solar flare?