Younger Dryas Hurricanes

10 Oct 2017

At https://phys.org/print426427240.html ... considering recent wailing by the CAGW fraternity, hurricanes have increased because of global warming (ignoring the fact hurricanes have been short in supply in recent years) research has thrown up an anomaly. During the almost Ice Age conditions of the Younger Dryas episode hurricanes, surprisingly, were fairly frequent in nature - as far as Florida was concerned. It is thought that warming of the equatorial Atlantic may play a role in the birth and wind up of hurricanes but in the Younger Dryas the ocean circulation system was restrained by the cold weather in the North Atlantic regions. In spite of this turbidites (evidence of smashed up shells and churned sediments) were common - or certainly more frequent than imagined (prior to the research). Hurricanes in cool weather conditions doesn't fit well with the global warming connection - and only guesswork can really attempt to explain it. Is it telling us something about the Younger Dryas - its nature, extent, or variation. In normal circumstances, if the current world is normal that is, the ocean circulation system distributes warm water from equatorial regions and is replaced by cold water from cooler regions. However, if the ocean circulation system differed in the Younger Dryas - or only reached mid N Atlantic latitudes, how do you get the hurricanes caused by a build-up of heat in the oceans. Other factors seem at play.