In The News

Welcome to our "In the News" page, featuring summaries of Internet news, relevant to Catastrophism and Ancient History.

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29 May 2018
A Tale of Two Stratospheres

At http://spaceweather.com (clink link to 24th May 2018) we have a tale of two stratospheres. Lunar eclipses are brief but they allow scientists to see the upper atmosphere clearly. At the Global Monitoring annual conference in Boulder, Colorado, two new results were announed after analysis of two decades of lunar eclipse monitoring. The stratsophere is as clear as it has been for decades - there are very few aerosols up there. This is important, we are informed, as it is the stratosphere that allows sunlight in to warm the Earth at the surface.

28 May 2018
Jellyfish Sprites

At http://spaceweather.com May 26th 2018 jeely fish sprites over Oklahoma ....

28 May 2018
Interstellar Interloper

At www.astronomy.com/2018/05/the-first-interstellar-immigrant#.WwkdtRo80vA.... ... (link provided by Jovan). In a study published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society; Letter, astronomers announced the discovery of the first interstellar object known to have taken up permanent residence in the solar system, an asteroid. It has a peculiar yet stable orbit. It is almost in perfect resonance with Jupiter yet travels in the opposite direction.

28 May 2018
Rainfall Records

At https://phys.org/print446394010.html ... ancient rainfall records stretching back 550,000 years into the past show a monsoon pattern closely in step with the Ice Ages. The article is in the journal Science (May 25th 2018). During the northern hemisphere summer the tropics and sub-tropics north of the equator warm while the tropics and sub-tropics south of the equator cool. The Asian monsoon season brings rainfall to about a half of the world's population -between April and September.

27 May 2018
Planet Nine Update

At www.scientificamerican.com/article/looking-for-planet-nine-astronomers-g... ... sent in by Jovan this is an update on the search for planet 9 and why a group of astronomers think there is another planet out there beyond the orbit of Neptune, somewhere in the Kuiper Belt. There must be a very big something much further out - according to Brown and Betygin of Caltech. They speculate it is ten times the size of the earth and has a 20,000 year orbit. Indeed, if they fail to find it soon they are thinking it has an even more elongated orbit.

27 May 2018
Philistines

According to Ariel David (at Haaretz, July 23rd 2017) the Philistines of the Bible may not have an origin in the Agean - and may not be a sea people at all, but native to northern Syria - or somewhere close to that region. He quotes a professor from the Israel Museum in Jerusalm, one Shirley Ben Dor Evian, whose reasoning is quite interesting - but no doubt some historians can find some odd threads she has woven and tug at the ends of them in order to disentangle the web she has weaved.

24 May 2018
Dinosaurs that swim

Robert sent in this link ... which is actually a few years old. At http://brianjford.com/w-dino01.htm ... dinosaurs are usually thought to be great lumbering land animals, or perhaps with a fondness for a swamp. However, how such a beast managed to keep its huge tail aloft is a basic problem as no actual marks of tails touching the ground have ever been found fossilised - but marks of crocodile tails have been fossilised. The latter move along the ground of course but just keeping a big dinosaur's tail aloft was no mean feat.

21 May 2018
Neutrons

At www.insidescience.org/news/what-can-death-neutrons-tell-us-about-dark-ma... ... physicists are currently speculating that decaying neutrons may be producing particles unknown to science - that make up the elusive dark matter. Exactly how long a neutron might live is also under debate. If neutrons decay into particles of dark matter it solves a big mystery as some cosmologists actually think dark matter makes up four fifths of all matter in the universe. Added to the protons and electrons the neutrons currently make up the visible universe, it is thought.

21 May 2018
supernova and life on earth

At https://phys.org/print445854431.html ... could recent supernova explosions be responsible for mass extinctions - or some mass extinction events to be more precise. The story is in NASAs Astrobiology Magazine at www.astrobio.net ... In particular two lesser known extinction events (or part extinction events as opposed to globally significant events), at 2.5 and 8 million years ago. The idea being put out to fellow scientists is that supernova explosions may have depleted Earth's ozone layer. The one at 2.5 million years ago coincided with the end of the Pliocene era.

18 May 2018
Ozone munching chemicals

At https://phys.org/print445696943.html ... envrionmentalists, a somewhat blanket term but in this instance meaning CAGW enthusiasts with an agenda, still persist in the belief CFCs are destroying the ozone layer in spite of numerous studies that say it is the solar wind that disperses ozone in the upper atmosphere, are at it again - but in this instance they may be slapping themselves in the face. Apparently, they've discovered the Chinese, or a close neighbour of them, is disregarding the UN ban on the production of CFCs (that the environmentalists claim has healed the ozone hole).