In The News

Welcome to our "In the News" page, featuring summaries of Internet news, relevant to Catastrophism and Ancient History.

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6 May 2017
catastrophist geology

SIS member Robert has a post on the Thunderbolts forum, go to http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=16703 ... subject, catastrophist geology. 

6 May 2017
Earth Sank Twice

This is the headline at https://phys.org/print413031282.html ... the earth sank twice flooding eastern Amazonia - according to a team that found a shark tooth in the NW part of the Amazon basin, deep inland. They are suggesting its presence, and that of other marine organisms, show that when the Andes rose in an uplift event, eastern Amazonia sank - on two separate occasions. Further, each event lasted for around a million years (according to uniformitarian geochronology). Water from the Caribbean flooded the region from Venezuela to NW Brazil.

6 May 2017
Volcanoes, Meteorites

At https://phys.org/print413024026.html ... ancient meteorite impact sparked long lived volcanic eruptions on Earth is the claim. Not only can meteorites create craters but they can spark volcanic activity as well, according to a team of geochemists from Trinity College in Dublin. They dated rocks at the impact site, Sudbury in Ontario, some 1.85 billion years ago (way back in the uniformitarian past), when a massive bolide excavated a deep basin which was subsequently filled with melted rocks. On top of the impact evidence, they encountered a jumble of rocks with volcanic fragments.

6 May 2017
Troodontids

At https://phys.org/print413016938.html ... we have a new species of troodontid with what appears to be an asymmetric feather construct, found in China. It looks a bit like a large pheasant, although the investigators liken it to a chicken. The research is published in Nature Communications (May 2017) and the specimen is dated at 125 million years ago. It seems to be a bird that may have been able to fly - but this has not been verified certainly. It may have flown in short bursts like a modern pheasant. Do chickens fly?

5 May 2017
Jupiter

At www.newscientist.com/article/2129805-first-results-from-jupiter-probe-sh... ... Gary sent in this link to the New Scientist website - Jupiter probe shows huge magnetism and storms. Big planets come with big surprises, the author of the piece begins - and yes, surprises seem to be in store. The annual meeting of the European Geosciences Union was treated to the first release of data from the Juno spacecraft, now in orbit around Jupiter. It's a game changer. There is a dense zone of ammonia gas around its equator and lots of ammonia clouds elsewhere.

5 May 2017
Electric Arc Welder

At https://malagabay.wordpress.com/2017/05/03/indian-impacts-hammerhead-geo... ... which is a great post by Louis Hissink, an unconventional geologist from Australia. He begins by quoting Fred Hoyle who said that one of the reasons scientific problems persist was because scientists involved tend to think with one or two ideas, which infers the possibility of getting at the truth was limited.

5 May 2017
Emmet Sweeney

In Chronology and Catastrophism Workshop 1987:1 there is an article by Emmet Sweeney. He is better known for revisions of historical chronology and has written several articles on the subject in more recent SIS literature. He has a web site -go to www.emmetsweeney.org ( see also www.wikibin.org/articles/emmet-sweeney.html ).

3 May 2017
Cheese Rolling

The journal Mathematics Today also has an article on the mathematics of rolling a large round haunch of cheese down a hill - the annual pastime of cheese rolling (page 63). See www.ima.org.uk/5625/westward-ho-musings-mathematics-mechanics/ ... See also the official website for cheese rolling at Cooper's Hill in Gloucestershire, www.cheese-rolling.co.uk - but see also an article on the Painleve Paradox in the IMA journal 81:3, DOI:https://doi.org/10.1033/imamat/hxw027 - the mathematics of rolling a cheese down a hill.

1 May 2017
Mathematics

The Institute of Mathematicians publication, Mathematics Today, volume 53:2 (April 2007) has a couple of interesting pieces (www.ima.org.uk - where there is a link to most of the current crop of stories, from cheese rolling to Vulcan bombers. We have a piece on mathematician Katherine Johnson.s role in the first manned flight by NASA (made into a film with Taranji P Henson playing her ole and Kevin Costner that of John Glenn). On page 50 we have 'A Doctor Writes ...

30 Apr 2017
Tokomark

The Tokomark ST40 fusion reactor is being developed in Oxfordshire. It hopes to be able to compete with the Americans and the Chinese, generating electricity from plasma. Go to www.energyvoice.com/otherenergy/137847/uk-reactor-takes-frst-step-toward... ... and the claim is that it is being financed solely from private venture capital (with no government subsidies at all).