In The News

Welcome to our "In the News" page, featuring summaries of Internet news, relevant to Catastrophism and Ancient History.

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22 Feb 2010
Another Catastrophe

Science Daily February 17th ... a Nature Geoscience paper on the Carbon Cycle before humans has found that 100 million years ago there were large changes as a result of a massive amount of volcanic activity that introduced carbon dioxide and sulphur into the atmosphere. At the same time one third of marine life died out - which they suggest was due to a drop in oxygen levels in the oceans.

19 Feb 2010
Lake Baikal

Daily Galaxy February 17th (www.dailygalaxy.com ) ... Lake Baikal is the oldest, the largest and the deepest lake on the planet. It's reckoned to be 25 million year of age and has a diversity of plant and animal species unknown elsewhere in the world - including the freshwater seal. Many of the unique fish in Baikal resemble deep sea species rather than freshwater ones. There are forests of sponges in the lake that resemble the Caribbean - but it is located in the sub Arctic.

19 Feb 2010
Ghana, Carthage, and Tutankhamun

BBC News February 17th ... archaeologists have unearthed dozens of clay figures in Ghana that are thought to shed some light on pre-Islamic society (80 sculptures dating between 600-1200AD). The culture appears to have disappeared when Islam arrived - they either converted to the new religion or were the victims of the slave trade.

19 Feb 2010
Chiefio

www.climategate.com/czechgate-climate-scientists-dump-worlds-second-oldest-record.html John O'Sullivan says a sceptic blogger known as Chiefio - who is in fact computer specialist EM Smith (see earlier posts) claims the Global Historical Climatology Network has cynically dumped the world's second oldest and reliable climate record at Prague for no obvious scientific reason.

17 Feb 2010
Canal

http://www.newkerala.com/news/fullnews-50538.html February 13th. This Indian newspaper says that explorer Colonel Blashford-Snell has discovered evidence of a canal in Nicaragua, a route between the Atlantic and the Pacific that existed 100s of years prior to Panama. He is now planning another expedition to see if it is possible to navigate the route. Old maps actually show a passage between the oceans but this was rejected as fanciful by historians and almost everyone else.

17 Feb 2010
Bronze Age boats in the Atlantic

www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/environment/archaeology/7228108/Bronze-age-ship.html Daily Telegraph, February 13th ... a trading vessel carrying a cargo of tin and copper ingots was found on the sea bed off the coast of Devon - and dates back to the Late Bronze Age, around 900BC. Copper and tin was used to make bronze used for weapons, tools, jewellery, ornaments and ornamentation.

17 Feb 2010
Medieval High Life

Irish Times at www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2010/0216/1224264553851_pf.html February 16th ... archaeologists in Kilkenny have discovered evidence of medieval abbots living the high life - the remains of roast swan and joints of beef washed down with French wine were found in the house of the Abbot, adjoining the abbey. The monks themselves lived more frugally, a simple more ascetic way of life.

17 Feb 2010
Corals in the Andaman Sea

www.physorg.com February 15th ... corals in the warm waters of the Andaman Sea in the NE part of the Indian Ocean have upset AGW alarmism that claims coral reefs will die out as the oceans become too warm - pointing their finger in particular at the Great Barrier Reef. The findings will be published on February 20th in the Journal of Biogeography.

17 Feb 2010
Ice Age Anomalies

Science News February 11th ... coastal caves on the Ballearic Islands just off the coast of Spain (including Majorca) have produced some very surprising evidence of sea level rise and fall during the last Ice Age, a finding that might cast some doubt on just how long such cold spells may actually last, develop, and remain. The theory is that during the Ice Ages immense volumes of water are locked up in land based ice sheets. In that situation sea levels would fall, revealing large areas of what is now the submerged coastal shelf system.

17 Feb 2010
The Vancouver Sun and archaeology stories

Two stories from the Vancouver Sun (see www.vancouversun.com and click on archaeology stories). On December 29th 2009 it was revealed that a study has found what people were eating a 100,000 years ago in southern Africa. Dozens of stone tools found during excavation are the earliest evidence, so far, of human reliance on grain (Julio Mercader of the University of Calgary). The diet of early humans was much more diverse than archaeologists have previously realised. Grains were as much part of their diet as roots, tubers, fruit and berries.