In The News

Welcome to our "In the News" page, featuring summaries of Internet news, relevant to Catastrophism and Ancient History.

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24 May 2010
The Sudan, Cyprus, and Tracks that aren't tracks ... or are they?

At www.nytimes.com/2010/05/22/arts/22iht-melik22.html ... the New York Times May 22nd has a story on Meroe in present day Sudan. Its art and religion had historical parallels with Egypt but it also had a distinct indigenous element. It cursive script has now been decyphered - and it is an African language as expected, closely related to those spoken today in Dafur and Chad, as well as modern Sudan (and ancient Nubia).

23 May 2010
Revealing the True Solar Corona

This is an article from American Scientist May/June 2010 volume 98:3, p212-9, and is written by Richard Woo. It can be fully downloaded from www.americanscientist.org/issues/pub/2010/3/revealing-the-true-solar-corona/1 but when downloading set the printer to landscape mode as the text is wide.

23 May 2010
Hinode Solar Optical Telescope update (solar flares)

At www.physorg.com/print193597764.html we are informed Hinode has identified the origin of white light emissions in solar flares. The source of the  white light had not been clarified since it was discovered in the 19th century. A solar flare is the most energy intensive explosion to be observed within the confines of the solar system and different ways of studying them have been used - from X-rays, radion and  chromospheric spectral lines.

23 May 2010
Fish Extinctions

At www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100517152518.htm it is claimed a mass extinction of fish some 360 million years ago reset the button on earth's life forms triggering modern vertabrae biodiversity. The mass extinction event, it is theorised, scrambled the species pool near the juncture when the first vertebrae were crawling out of the water on to the land.

23 May 2010
Big Bang, Anti Matter, and ...

The Daily Galaxy on May 19th asked, does the large scale structure of the universe nix big bang theory? There is apparently a growing body of evidence which questions whether the universe began with a big bang 14 million years ago. Several cosmologists challenge the theory that has dominated science in recent years - another one of those consensus theories that has become almost a hard fact.

21 May 2010
Archaeology of the YD boundary event

At http://journalofcosmology.com/Extinction119.html 'Archaeological Perspectives on the Extra Terrestrial Impact Hypothesis at 12900BC: A View from Western North America' by Terry Jones - available to download in pdf format. It is surprising that so many Clovis culture objects and associated archaeology are assumed to date from the Clovis Period (the few centuries or so leading up to the YD event) and Palaeo-Indian Holocene deposits do not appear to connect with them.

20 May 2010
Layering of Loess

At http://calderup.wordpress.com Nigel Calder has a post on the 1960s discovery by Czech geologist George Kukla, who counted the layers of loess, each separated by darker bands of material thought to be left over from warm interglacial periods. Kukla found too many layers of loess - and this did not fit into current thinking. Until then everyone had been thinking in terms of just four Ice Ages.

20 May 2010
Ball Lightning

At www.physorg.com/print 192952150.html according to physicists at the University of Innsbruck in Austria (see http://arxiv.org/abi/1005.1153 ) magnetic fields associated with lightning are powerful enough to produce hallucinations of hovering balls of light in nearby observers and these 'visions' are interpreted as ball lightning. The researchers based their hypothesis on magnetic fields used in clinical transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS).

20 May 2010
Phobus

At www.sciencenews.org May 14th ... Phobus, the larger moon of the planet Mars, appears to be porous - an amalgamation of space rubble (see Geophysical Research Letters May 16th). The density of Phobus is not dissimilar to asteroids but quite how Mars could have captured an asteroid without breaking it to pieces is an unknown.

14 May 2010
Survival of the Fittest

www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/10051010533.htm from a paper in Nature May 9th ... researchers used entire islands in the Bahamas to test the theory, survival of the fittest. Competition among lizards was found to be more important than predation by birds and snakes when it came to survival. They covered several small islands with bird-proof netting while others were left open, and on some islands snakes were added to expose the lizards to a greater degree of predation.