In The News

Welcome to our "In the News" page, featuring summaries of Internet news, relevant to Catastrophism and Ancient History.

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13 May 2010
Hole in Clouds

At info [at] jpl [dot] nasa [dot] gov May 11th (see www.jpl.nasa,gov/news ) the Herschel Space Observatory has found a gaping hole in clouds surrounding a batch of young stars - providing astronomers with a glimpse into the star forming process. It is alleged. Stars are born obscured by dense clouds of dust and gas so little is actually known about the process - but theories exist. Now it seems there is a hole in the cloud surrounding the latest star birth event - but what might have blown the hole open?

13 May 2010
Neanderthals and Genes.

Science Daily May 6th (see www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100506141559.htm ) the fossil record indicates modern humans differ physically from Neanderthals.

11 May 2010
Land of Punt

A story in the San Franscisco Chronicle at www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2010/05/-7/MNBN1D3U74.DTL May 8th appears to confirm the Land of Punt was somewhere in the Eritrea/Ethiopia region, a region favoured for some time by historians. To the Pharaohs the Land of Punt was the source of treasure - or prized objects of trade. This included exotic animals such as leopards and baboons.

11 May 2010
Gravitational Waves

At www.telegraph.co.uk/science/space/7695994/Largest-scientific-instrument-ever-built-to-prove-Einsteins-theory-of-relativity.html May 9th ... physicists from NASA and the ESA intend to search for gravitational waves - as predicted by Einstein. These are the last strand of the theory of general relativity  that has still to be proved correct.

11 May 2010
Seeding the earth

At http://calderup.wordpress.com May 10th ... Nigel Calder freely admits he was not keen to embrace the idea comets seeded life on earth when it was first proposed by Hoyle and Ramasinghe (when he was editor of New Scientist). In the meantime he has changed his mind and reports on a French team that has found extraterrestrial dust grains rich in carbon  in the snow of Antarctica (see also Science May 7th).

11 May 2010
Blobs of crust that excite

www.newscientist.com/article/dn18877-dents-in-earths-gravitational-field-due-to-plumes.html?full=true&print=true May 9th ... old pieces of continental crust that are thought to fall to the bottom of earth's mantle region are being blamed for mysterious dents in the planet's gravitational field. At some points on  the globe, such as the middle of the Indian Ocean, the NE Pacific, and the Ross Sea, earth's gravitational field is weaker.

11 May 2010
Ho Hum ...

The blogosphere got a bit agitated the other day when 225 members of the American National Academy of Sciences 'paid' for a letter to be published in Science complaining about victimisation by climate sceptics.

11 May 2010
New Chronology Update May 10th

The New Chronology Yahoo group has a series of emails from Eric Aitchison on reign lengths, and dynasties 18, 19 and 20 in respect of Manetho and other ancient sources. He is arguing that Manetho is more reliable than some forum members are prepared to admit.

11 May 2010
Second Law of Thermodynamics

At http://scienceofdoom.com/2010/05/08/radiation-basics-and-the-imaginary-second-law-of-thermodynamics/ is the second post at this site concerning sceptic arguments that cite the Second Law of Thermodynamics - usually in a puffed and fillibusting manner. The second law is supposed to contradict global warming, and popped up online and in print at American Thinker, a Republican orientated magazine that very often has some interesting articles.

10 May 2010
Space Blob

A strange jelly like substance appears to fall out of the sky giving rise to the term, star jelly, and variously the rot of the stars. It is sometimes associated with meteorites. Not always as other people see it as regurgitated frog spawn. Indigestible pieces of frogs and toads, discarded by birds, foxes, or cats, that retch the stuff up - an idea that has traction when you consider it is often found in gardens, or where people walk and observe. It also occurs in rural locations but fewer people notice it. Reports of star jelly go back for centuries.