In The News

Welcome to our "In the News" page, featuring summaries of Internet news, relevant to Catastrophism and Ancient History.

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25 Aug 2010
Mush

At www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100823131743.htm there is a piece on archaeology in Utah some 10,000 years ago (early Holocene) which shows a distinct change in diet that may be significant. People living in a rock shelter adopted grinding stones in order to mill the very small seeds of sage brush, making a flour that was cooked into a mush - or porridge. It therefore has analogies with the adoption of oat porridge in Europe at an indeterminate point in time.

25 Aug 2010
Jupiter smacked again

At www.dailygalaxy.com August 23rd ... we have a story that is repeated at many other internet sources but I like this one as it includes further information. Jupiter was hit again by an object, caaptured on film this time by an amateur Japanese astronomer. When he made the claim, with a an image to back it up, the Hubble space camera swang around and various terrestrial space telescopes (and no doubt amateur back window ones too) homed in on Jupiter and confirmed that an impact had probably occurred (the aftermath).

25 Aug 2010
A Sun Spot

At http://www.cieletespace.fr/node/5752 the website of Ciel et l'Espace, a French astronomy magazine, has published a picture of a sun spote (below)

It is the most detailed ever taken in visible light - and the website intends to publish further images. They have an origin in the US, at the Big Bear Solar Observatory, a unique location on a lake (see http://wattsupwiththat.com )

24 Aug 2010
Anti-matter going bang

At www.dailygalaxy.com August 21st (see also BBC News) .... anti-matter can create huge explosions is an accurate statement but anti-matter meeting matter isn't actually an explosion - it is dubbed an annihilation. A space search for anti matter via a particle detector onboard the space shuttle Endeavour, is set to launch in september where it will be transferred to the International Space Station and operate over the next 18 years. The hope is that they will find this elusive property.

24 Aug 2010
Numbers

At http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1548-1433.2010.01245.x/full there is a longish piece about a lost language and the discovery of a numbering system from coastal Peru that was lost after colonisation by Europeans.

24 Aug 2010
Nebra Speculation

At www.monstersandcritics.com/science/news/articl_1579505.php/Nebra-sky-disk-discarded-because-of-volcanic-ash-scientists-say/  August 23rd ... German scientists think a volcano was responsible for the burial of the Nebra sky disc at roughly 3600 years ago. Amazingly, they are talking about the eruption of Thera in the Mediterranean, many miles distant from Saxony-Anhalt where the astronomical device was found. Now, it might be that the scientists were having a bit of fun - but no, they were very serious.

24 Aug 2010
Sea Level around the coast of Britain in the Holocene

Ian Shennan of the Sea Level Research Unit at Durham University has written and co-authored a number of books and articles on the subject but as with all modern science, computers have predictably been seconded to provide a knowledge base, and modelling, as always, has been developed as an aid to see how small changes over many years may have panned out at different points in time. There is of course nothing wrong with that - it is an extremely useful tool, supposing all the information is fed into the models.

24 Aug 2010
Some further catastrophic web sites

At http://craterhunter.wordpress.com/2010/08/17/infernignite/ ... Dennis Cox suggests naming post impact plasma vortice of large airburst impact events which are commonly mistaken as ignimbrite, or volcanic tuff, as infernignite. This, he says, is impact melt formed when a terrain is flash melted, ablated, and forged by intense heat and the pressure of the vortice. Infernignites, he goes on, are formed and emplaced in an atmospheric pressure driven scenario and resemble a pyraclastic flow.

22 Aug 2010
Magnetic fields of stars - a breakthrough?

At www.physorg.com/print201526370.html ... a University of Dundee press release claims a breakthrough in the study of magnetic fields - which will add to what we know about stars including our Sun. The team, from a magnetohydrodynamics research group, used computer simulation of plasma in the atmosphere of the Sun and by looking at how the magnetic field responded to plasma they have uncovered what they say are now rules that govern, or exact influence, over the solar atmosphere.

21 Aug 2010
Galactic volcanoes

At www.physorg.com/print201424073.html we have an image of a galactic volcano - erupting. Of course, it isn't a real volcano but it is likened to one (see also www.dailygalaxy.com August 21st for a slightly different slant). The image comes from NASAs Chandra X-ray Observatory and happened 50 million light years away - in the centre of the Virgo cluster.