In The News

Welcome to our "In the News" page, featuring summaries of Internet news, relevant to Catastrophism and Ancient History.

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7 Mar 2010
Ice Age Florida

http://www.tcpalm.com March 4th ... a local newspaper with a story about human bones found in association with extinct Pleistocene animals - in Florida. Excavations are being organised to unearth more information but provisionally they are assumed to date shortly before the YD boundary event. The discovery was made some 80 years ago during the digging out of a canal. It hit national newspapers at the time but scientists ignored it as they did not believe humans coexisted with mammoths and other beasts of the Pleistocene fauna.

7 Mar 2010
K/T Boundary

www.physorg.com March 4th ... the asteroid impact at the K/T boundary left a clear band between light coloured Cretaceous sediments and dark coloured Palaeocene sediments (a picture of the geology is provided online), recovered from the sea floor off South America. The abrupt shift in colour reflects an instantaneous drop in ocean biological productivity. There is also an online video (including an audio interview and animated graph) of the asteroid impact, with Dr Joanna Morgan of Imperial College explaining the science.

7 Mar 2010
Ocean Heat

www.physorg.com March 4th ... a study by Raffaele Ferrari and two students (published by Geophysical Research Letters) has shown that the role of hurricanes has been over-estimated simply because previous studies have not taken into account the seasons. Most of the heat from warm water that hurricanes mix deep into the oceans during the summer and autumn periods is returned to the atmosphere during winter. This indicates that 'warm anomalies' do not affect long term ocean temperature.

7 Mar 2010
Highest mountain in the world

http://www.dailygalaxy.com March 4th ... Mount Everest is the highest mountain in the world at 29,000 feet, so it is generally believed. However, when the equatorial bulge is taken into account, the earth being oblate as it spins, flattened at the pole and bulging at the equator, it seems that Mount Chinborozo in the Andes, at only 20,000 feet, situated on that bulge, is the highest point on the planet. A bit of random and completely useless information but there you are.

7 Mar 2010
Toba Super Volcano

www.dailygalaxy.com March 4th ... the Toba super volcano appears to have been overhyped. It is said to have blown around 74,000 years ago and was responsible for a 1000 year cooling episode - but quite how these things are measured from so long ago must leave root for alternative explanations. At one point scientists were saying that humans became almost extinct at this time - until somebody pointed out that Neanderthals appear to have thrived and the Hobbit persisted in fairly close proximity to the Toba eruption.

7 Mar 2010
Antarctic Impact

http://cosmictusk.com ... the BBC reported from the 'lunar and Planetary Conference' in Texas by saying, 'a large space rock may have exploded over Antarctica thousands of years ago, showering a large area with debris. The evidence comes from tiny meteoritic particles and a layer of extraterrestrial dust found in Antarctic ice cores. The event would have been similar to the 1908 Tunguska event' they said. Looks like another one - they are coming thick and fast.

6 Mar 2010
YD Boundary Event Updates

New Scientist 204-2734 November 14th 2009 page 10 ... Kate Revilous claimed a mud core from the bottom of Lough Monreagh in western Ireland shows that the Younger Dryas event was so quick that very cold conditions set in within less than a year - possibly within weeks.

6 Mar 2010
The River Eem

The Herholz Centre for Environmental Research (see http://www.alphagalileo.org ) March 3rd ... the Eemian Interglacial between 126,000 and 115,000 years ago is named after the river Eem in the Netherlands. It was followed by a glacial period that came to an end 15,000 years ago, known as the Weichselian after the Polish river Weichsel. At it's peak some 21,000 years ago it's glaciers stretched as far south as Berlin (or nearly so). Researchers have studied lake sediments to reconstruct the climate history of the Eemian.

6 Mar 2010
Akhenaten Mummy

News from the Valley of the Kings (see http://kv64.info ) March 2nd ... a week or so ago Zahi Hawass claimed the mummy in Kv55 is 'probably' Akhenaten. The media accepted this attribution as a fact but this article disagrees - and says the mummy in Kv55 was not Akhenaten. She draws on the personal relationships between the last members of dynasty 18 and the role of Ay, a brief successor to Tutankhamun. Velikovsky, of course, saw some strange relationships among the final few kings, is his book Oedipus and Akhenaten.

6 Mar 2010
Fossil Coral, Spirits in the Sand, and Lakes in the Sahara

Science Daily March 2nd http://www.sciencedaily.com id100301182106 ... fossil coral a half a million years of age seems to show reefs are quite capable of withstanding stress imposed by global warming - or freezing. Reef ecosystems appear to have persisted through massive environmental changes imposed by sharply falling sea levels during previous Ice Ages. Eight reefs on Papua New Guinea show they survived from Ice Age to Ice Age (and the warming between).