Models and Proxies

At http://phys.org/print326994700.html ... we have an interesting story sent in by member William Thompson. He was fascinated by the fact there is actually a conflict of opinion regards global warming - between models and reality. An article in PNAS by Zhengyu Liu of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a variety of co-authors. They seem to have done the research ostensibly at the instigation of the IPCC. Why? It all revolves around an article in the journal Science published last year which claimed that for the last 7000 years global temperatures have been cooling.

North Africa and the spread of early humans

Humans living in North Africa, including what is now the Sahara desert, are thought to have been at the vanguard of the Out of Africa movement, the consensus scenario of human origins. Modern humans, that is. They were ideally placed to enter Europe and western Asia. This fact can actually be turned on its head as North Africa is ideally placed for migration in the opposite direction, from Europe and western Asia into Africa, as happened during the Holocene period.

Japanese origins

At http://heritageofjapan.wordpress.com there are several interesting new postings, a flurry of activity after a long quiet period. One, 'Study reveals DNA link between ancient Peruvians and Japanese' is a story that surfaced a few months ago - but interesting from a Japanese perspective. Another, 'Ram's Horn motif on painted tomb murals of western Japan points to the identity of the immigrant groups' claims that Turkic tribes reached Japan and Korea, from central Asia, in the past. The motif first appears during the Kofun Period.

Russian mission to study the high atmosphere

At http://tallbloke.wordpress.com/2014/08/16/satellite-mission-on-high-atmo... ... is due to launch in 2015 and a web site in English is scheduled to record what it finds. The satellite is named after Lomonosov. He lived between 1711 and 1765 and helped establish the Moscow University in 1755. The idea is to study cosmic rays (the solar wind), gamma rays bursts, transient luminous phenomena in the upper atmosphere, and magnetospheric particles. It's all getting very exciting - are we on the verge of a paradigm shift?

Cyprus and Peoples of the Sea

At www.q-mag.org/cyprus-salt-lakes-exonerate-peoples-of-the-sea-causing-the... ... there is a post taken from a 2012 article (a link to the pdf version is provided) which revolves around salt lakes near Larnaca. They have discovered evidence of drought and dry weather that lasted several generations, by analysing sediments from the lakes. The lakes were once a sea harbour - and have silted up. Hence, it seems environmental change was the trigger for the Bronze Age collapse (or that is what the authors of the research seem to think).

Gunnar Heinsohn and the first millennium AD

Gunnar Heinsohn and Trevor Palmer are currently locked into a debate that mainly centres around the conventional version of Roman history. Palmer is on the mainstream side, producing reams of evidence in support of his position, and Heinsohn, as is his want, is lobbing the occasional hand grenade to cause a splutter or two. Now, Heinsohn's ideas have been taken up by the redoubtable Tim Cullen and he has his own variation on it all - - go to http://malagabay.wordpress.com/2014/08/16/friends-romans-countrymen/ ...

Defending the consensus model

At http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08/discovery-suggests-... ... a set of tusks in a museum, once attached to a mastodon skull that was thrown overboard, ended up in the nets of fishermen from Chesapeake Bay, along with some stone tools. They have been stored away for some 40 years or so, in the dark recesses of a museum. The interesting thing about them is that the sea floor in which they were dredged up from is continental shelf that would have been dry land during the last Ice Age. It is the North American equivalent of the North Sea basin.

The other comet is also set to cause a stir

At http://phys.org/print327069680.html ... comet Siding Spring, the other comet of interest this autumn, will pass by Mars in October, just 132,000km away - which is the equivalent of a comet passing the Earth at one third the distance away from the Moon. A spokesman is quoted, 'we hope to witness two atmospheres colliding'. Planets have atmospheres (Mars is on the thin side) but so do comets, he claims - only it is called a coma and is capable of stretching to the width of Jupiter.

Erupting Filaments

A magnetic filament winding down the face of the Sun has been compared to a canyon of fire at www.spaceweather.com August 17th. It appeared two days previously, launching a CME towards the Earth (expected to arrive on Monday). The web site has a video clip of the appearance and eruption of the filament.

The names of the gods

Victor Clube has an article in SIS Review V:4, 'Cometary Catastrophes and the ideas of Immanuel Velikovsky' and whilst admitting the Clube and Napier theory as outlined in 'The Cosmic Serpent' was by no means perfect and was probably strewn with gaffs of one kind or another, the basic idea that comets rather than planets were the agents of disaster (and more significantly, the meteor streams produced by progenitor comets) were sound.