Frankenstein and the Comet of Yore

www.thunderbolts.info March 9th ... 'Frankenstein's Comet: Sparks of Life' ... this is unfortunately a very short piece on what is a very interesting aspect of the past. Basically, the author draws a comparison with the Frankenstein story, bringing a monster to life with the aid of high voltage electricity passed through a lifeless corpse - but basically possessing the feasibility of life.

Oh to be a Sunbeam

www.thunderbolts.info March 10th ... 'The Sunbeam of Yore' explores features associated with  the axis mundi or world axis - a column of dazzling light visible in the sky. For example, Sumerian temples, such as that of Gudea of Lagash, 'made Ningursu's house come out like the Sun from the clouds' - a sunbeam, so that it 'rises like the Sun over the Land ... and illuminates the assembly like a delightful moonlight'.

Boat Mummies

This subject comes up on a regular basis but research by Chinese archaeologists have clarified some issues - but introduced other ideas. The New York Times (see www.nytimes.com March 17th) which begins by describing the location of the dessicated corpses (rather than real mummies) in a desert to the north of Tibet, and tells us that Chinese archaeologists have excavated an extraordinary cemetery - first excavated by Scandinavians some 50 years or so ago and off-limits to westerners for most of the time since then.

Dogs

www.physorg.com/print188045220.html ... contrary to research published last year, using genetics, domesticated dogs originated in East Asia and were used as a supplementary meat source in lean times of the year. Dogs are still eaten in China - and across Siberia and East Asia (and the practise was transferred into North America by migrants). Another genetic study at about the same time suggested village dogs in Africa may have been the origin of some, if not many, dog breeds.

Red Spot

The Daily Galaxy, March 17th ) www.dailygalaxy.com - 'Unlocking the Secrets of Jupiter's Giant Red Spot' claims the red spot is a region of storminess, the reddest bits a warm core within an otherwise cold storm system. The findings come from an article in Icarus but see also www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2010-086&cid=release_2010-086.htm where thermal images show the red spot in greater clarity than ever before.

Geomythology

An interesting web site to view is at http://tsun.sscn.ru/hinsg/data.htm which has four maps of the world. On them are marked confirmed impact structures, some 180 of them on the continental surfaces and just 24 known from beneath the oceans. The maps also mark out evidence of historical tsunami events.  On the same web site, the Holocene Impact Working Group, are a number of interesting pages including a Timeline of Activities.

One Big Head

www.physorg.com/print187877156.html ... a replica of a Cro Magnon skull has provided evidence that the human brain has been shrinking. The skull comes from a skeleton found in a cave in the Dordogne and dates back 28,000 years ago. Scientists digitally scanned the interior of the empty skull which revealed the impression left by the brain on the neuro cranium - which then revealed the brain was 20 per cent larger than that of modern humans. 

The Druid's Arms

www.thisisbristol.co.uk/news/Finding-stones-near-Bristol-place-history/article ... Stanton Drew stone circle may be much older than previously thought due to the discovery of new evidence by amateur archaeologists from a local society, Bath and Camerton. It seems that long before the stone circle was erected around 2500BC there was a long barrow on the site - it's remains are now known as the Cove, three standing stones nestled at the back of the Druid's Arms pub car park.

Horticulture and Agriculture

There is another consensus model under attack. This time the oft repeated claim that plant cultivation made a sudden appearance in the Near East around 10,000 years ago and spread rapidly into Anatolia, the Balkans, through the Mediterranean and across central Europe (in one direction) and into the Indian sub-continent in the other. The spread of farmers into these regions is often integrated with the theory of the spread of language - in both directions. It also affects the way that human genes are being interpreted - in Europe for example.

Bad Archaeology and Velikovsky

www.badarchaeology.net/confused/velikovsky.php is apparently the brainchild of a couple of youngish archaeologists not long out of classes and fresh with all the group-think stuff they have learnt. They appear to feel obliged to comment on what they consider as 'bad archaeology' and 'bad history' and 'pseudo-science'in general. Lots of people come under their microscope - and the usual suspects include Velikovsky (and those they see as inspired by Velikovsky - such as David Rohl and Peter James).