Quark Gluon Plasma

www.physorg.com/print195306308.html June 9th ... for a few millionths of a second after the Big Bang the universe consisted of a hot soup of elementary particles called quarks and gluons. A few micro seconds later they cooled to form protons and neutrons - the building blocks of the universe.

Space Weather

At www.physorg.com/print195297437.html ... NASA are closely watching the Sun as it begins to come alive. The concern is solar storms - or flares with the possibility of disrupting global communications. The Sun is waking up again, they say, and space weather is an urgent consideration as the modern world and its technology is dependant on satellites.

Man-made aurora

At www.physorg.com/print195192885.html June 9th ... our understanding of terrestrial space weather has been partly based on incorrect assumptions on how nitrogen in the atmosphere reacts when it collides with electrons produced by energetic ultraviolet sunlight and the solar wind. NASA fired electrons of differing energies through a cloud of nitrogen gas in order to measure the ultraviolet light emitted as a result of the collision.

Dust in the atmosphere

At www.physorg.com/print195145467.html ... in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences it is being said that dust and pollen in the atmosphere causes higher levels of precipitation in clouds. It is now thought clouds have a greater cooling effect on the weather than previously admitted. This change of tack has come about because of extended research into clouds and their role in global warming.

Black Holes and the origin of Earth and Moon

www.physorg.com/print195150398.html June 7th ... a paper in the June issue of the Astronomical Journal was written on completion of a census of visible quasars that found 105,783 of them - in a quarter of the sky. What quasars are is not known - only that they are very luminous. One theory is that the light energy is being emitted by material fallin into black holes.

Turkmenistan, and Ethiopia

www.turkmenistan.ru/ June 8th ... Turkmenistan in Russia, excavations in the capital city Ashgabat have found there was a settlement there going back to the 6th millennium BC, defined as Neolithic and contemporary with Neolithic farming communities in Iran, Baluchistan, and the Fertile Crescent.

Aborigines blasted

At www.thunderbolts.info one of the forum subjects concerns the discovery in the area of Lake Mungo and Lake Victoria in Australia of the bones of an estimated 15,000 fossil bodies that seem to have died in a major catastrophic event. It was an ancient meeting place for Aborigines, and inter tribal gatherings like this were common amongst Pacific cultures. Indeed, they were common in many parts of the world, even in Europe.

SIS Study Group meeting

The SIS Study Group meeting at Teddington in June 2010 revolved around a talk by SIS member Tony Haynes, with the title 'The Quantum Electro Dynamic Universe of the Human Body'.

Tibet Glacier

www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100603091823.htm ... glaciers in Tibet were never much larger than they are now -  even at the height of the Ice Age and in spite of the fact the plateau is the largest and highest mountain region in the world. The researchers, using a mathematical model, have shown that a small fall in temperature, around 5 degrees (which is not much, relative to the annual fall in temperatures during the Ice Ages) would cause a small ice sheet to start to form, and that would grow.

The Yangtze River

Again, at www.physorg.com/print19845886.html ... we are told the Yangtze River is 40 million years older than previously thought because a study of minerals by a team from Durham University says the river began to cut hrough the Three Gorges area around 45 million years ago. The Three Gorges is in SW China and cuts through a range of inaccessible mountains that surround Sichuan Province, the rice bowl of China.