Turkmenistan, and Ethiopia

www.turkmenistan.ru/ June 8th ... Turkmenistan in Russia, excavations in the capital city Ashgabat have found there was a settlement there going back to the 6th millennium BC, defined as Neolithic and contemporary with Neolithic farming communities in Iran, Baluchistan, and the Fertile Crescent.

Aborigines blasted

At www.thunderbolts.info one of the forum subjects concerns the discovery in the area of Lake Mungo and Lake Victoria in Australia of the bones of an estimated 15,000 fossil bodies that seem to have died in a major catastrophic event. It was an ancient meeting place for Aborigines, and inter tribal gatherings like this were common amongst Pacific cultures. Indeed, they were common in many parts of the world, even in Europe.

SIS Study Group meeting

The SIS Study Group meeting at Teddington in June 2010 revolved around a talk by SIS member Tony Haynes, with the title 'The Quantum Electro Dynamic Universe of the Human Body'.

Tibet Glacier

www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100603091823.htm ... glaciers in Tibet were never much larger than they are now -  even at the height of the Ice Age and in spite of the fact the plateau is the largest and highest mountain region in the world. The researchers, using a mathematical model, have shown that a small fall in temperature, around 5 degrees (which is not much, relative to the annual fall in temperatures during the Ice Ages) would cause a small ice sheet to start to form, and that would grow.

The Yangtze River

Again, at www.physorg.com/print19845886.html ... we are told the Yangtze River is 40 million years older than previously thought because a study of minerals by a team from Durham University says the river began to cut hrough the Three Gorges area around 45 million years ago. The Three Gorges is in SW China and cuts through a range of inaccessible mountains that surround Sichuan Province, the rice bowl of China.

Bok Globules

At www.physorg.com/print194877369.html ... a Bok Globule is described as a dark cloud of dust and gas from which young stars form. They were originally discovered as dark splotches in fron of dense fields of stars and were given the title, holes in the heavens because they appeared, at first, to be holes in the stellar background.

Crocodiles riding ocean currents

See www.physorg.com/print194859447.html ... not really SIS material but interesting as it may have evolutionary implications. How did they learn to do it, for example, aand are crocodiles really such brutes. Crocodiles in Australia cross large expanses of sea by riding the current. They will lay in wait until the right current comes along to get where they want to go. Literally, they surf, as crocodiles are not particularly good swimmers. In this way they are able to migrate and populate South Pacific islands.

The Iowa Cicada

At www.physorg.com/print194880259.html ... there is a story about the rare appearance of the cicada, an insect, in Iowa - that is supposed to appear at 17 year intervals. Why?

Water on Mars

At www.msnbc.msn.com/id/37497904/01/technology_and_science-space/print we learn that a rare Mars rock holds the clue to water on the red planet. The rock outcrop is rich in carbonite minerals - which contain carbon dioxide and form readily in the presence of water. So, if conditions allowed carbonite rock to form, that would mean there was water on Mars at some stage.

Jupiter Hit ... again ...

See www.physorg.com/print194845088.html as Anthony Wesley, an amateur astronomer from Australia, was looking at Jupiter and witnessed a bright flash as an object struck Jupiter and burnt up in its atmosphere. He is the same sky gazer that last year spotted a scar the size of the Pacific Ocean near Jupiter's south pole  that was later proved to be an asteroid or comet strike. Using an infra-red telescope NASA found that indeed, Jupiter had been struck, and credited Wesley.