Galaxy super clusters and strings and things

At www.dailygalaxy.com September 17th ... there is a story on galaxy super clusters that may be related to the distribution of dark matter. Galaxies seem to clump together and are surrounded by empty space. The piece goes on to say the goal is to capture the most ancient light in the universe - the cosmic microwave background.

Aboriginal astronomy and other bits of archaeological news

At www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/sep/17/cave-paintings-found-in-somaliland/ is a report on the discovery of cave art at numerous sites in Somaliland. In the Irish Times (see www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2010/0917/1224279093813_pf.html ) there is a report on the discovery of a Viking site in County Louth, believed to be Linn Duchaill, founded in AD841 at the same time as Viking Dublin.

X-rays in Space

A University of Leicester press release on the 8th of September (see www2.le.ac.uk/ebulletin/news/press-release/2010-2019/2010/09/nparticle.2010 ) claims that the source of powerful X-rays in a nearby galaxy are said to be proof of the existence of a new species of black holes - targeted because of its extreme luminosity (and advertising a paper in the Astrophysical Journal published the same day).

Mysteries of the Moon

... or rather, mysteries of the Moon that really might not be as mysterious as this piece at www.disinfo.com/2010/09/who-parked-the-mooon/ would have its readers believe (sent in by Gary). It is actually reminiscent of a speaker at an SIS meeting a few years ago and begins rather tamely by telling us that the Moon is more complicated than scientists imagined. One such complication is said to concern the age of the Moon - which by its nature is highly speculative.

Comet Halley Again

At http://io9.com/5637815/ there is another version of the Comet Halley appearance in 466BC - with a bit more history. It could have been visiting the inner solar system for anything between 16,000 and 200,000 years (see also the Journal of Cosmology). The Chinese record the comet in 240BC and it is thought the Babylonians (people of the Middle East) record it in 164 and 87BC (as well as Tigranes, an Armenian king) and in 12BC it may have sparked messianic expectations - but who can tell.

A new way to produce electricity to power engines

At the Rumor Mill Robert Mason has posted details of a hydroelectrolytic turbine he has invented - go to www.rumormillnews.com/cgi-bin/forum.cgi?read=181024 which he hopes will be taken up by somebody commercially. He is also asking for some critique of his invention and as a new member of SIS hopes that other members might provide some feedback. See what you think. Does his idea have traction?

Comets in the Kuiper Belt

At http://calderup.wordpress.com/2010/09/13/kennelful-of-planet-puppies/ ... is about some images from the Hubble Space Telescope which show two remote objects in the Solar System slowly moving across the sky in front of a distant galaxy. They were moving while Hubble was recording and they appear in the images as streaks of light and seem to be comet like objects orbiting the Sun some 40 odd times further away than the earth.

Some dating issues

The New Chronology Yahoo Group forum has had the big guns posting during September - David Rohl, Bernard Newgrosh and Bob Porter for example. The issue that has caught their interest - the missing archaeology of the Persian Period. This is probably one of the really weak spots in conventional archaeology and ably exploited by  Emmett Sweeney elsewhere.

Koshkonong

Associated Press (see also http://host.madison.com/wsj/news/local/article_29848baa-be8b-11df-001cc4c00 ... a new road scheme at Koshkonong in Wisconsin has unearthed Native American artifacts - possibly as many as 100,000 of them which date back mainly between 5000BC and 1200AD.

The introduction of farming into Britain

The idea that farming was introduced into Britain from France is explored in Shennan, Collard and Thomas et at, in the Journal of Archaeological Science 37 issue 4: April 2010. Here it claims there was a large influx of people into Southern England and as far afield as Central Scotland, around 6000BP (5000-4500BC). Up until that point Britain was sparsely populated, a theory arrived at by the paucity of Mesolithic finds rather than genuine data - a factoid produced by what we don't know rather than what we might know.