Stone monument in Galilee

At www.livescience.com/47835-massive-5-000-year-old-stone-monument-revealed... ... located 8 miles north of the Sea of Galilee a massive structure, compose of 500.000 cubic feet of stone and at a length of 492 feet, is said to be shaped in a crescent formation - or a serpent. It has been dated by pottery to between 3050 and 2650BC. It was previously thought it was a normal kind of city wall - common in the Levant. However, no city has been found associated with it - it is entirely stand alone (or that is the way it seems at the moment).

Modelling Plate Tectonics

This is another consensus theory that is defended to the death. At http://phys.org/print330157486.html ... what kick started Plate Tectonics? Apparently the consensus theory has no beginning - does it have an ending. Never mind, all is well, another computer simulation puts it all back to what was going on 3 billion years ago.

Meanwhile, William Thompson sent a link to another piece of wishful thinking - go to www.bostonglobe.com/opinion/2014/09/16/bristol-overboard-climate-change/...

Red Indians and Europeans

At www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-09/hms-nba091514.php ... we have a story from an article in the September 18th Nature which is telling us that European genes contain northern Eurasian DNA related to the natives of N America. The study is based on genetics but the news itself is very old - I can remember reading the same thing months ago, even years ago. For example, in Clive Finlayson's book 'Humans Who Went Extinct' Oxford University Press:2009.

Forbush Decreases

At www.spaceweather.com September 18th .... on the 12th a CME hit Earth's magnetic field igniting an intense geomagnetic storm - and providing England with a week of summer temperatures. Students launched a helium Balloon into the stratosphere, expecting to measure lots more radiation than normal. Instead, them measured less - a lot less. Why?

Well, it seems that when the CME swept past the Earth it gathered up a lot of cosmic rays that normally occupy the upper atmosphere - sweeping them away. This process was first discovered in the 20th century by Scott Forbush.

The Gulf Stream in the Ice Age

At http://phys.org/print330072076.html ... an article in the journal Geology claims the Gulf Stream still flowed into the Nordic seas during the coldest parts of the Ice Age. Is this possible?

Ripples in Rock

Various explanations for the presence of what look like ripples or creases in sedimentary rocks have been proposed over the years. Some see them as evidence of long periods such as the Milankovitch cycles, and others see them as seasonal tide lines (a very short period as far as geochronology is concerned). At http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.co.uk/2014/09/ripples-in-ancient-... ... we have an even shorter stretch of time.

The nanodiamond debate

At http://cosmictusk.com/university-of-chicago-nanodiamonds-prove-cosmic-im... ... which is a reference to the recent Younger Dryas event. The same story is at http://wattsupwiththat.com/2014/09/11/microscopic-diamonds-suggest-cosmi... ... where the first comments become somewhat heated. However, the very first comment is somewhat reflective in that it says that if you ignore the Younger Dryas event the warming after the Ice Age is a straight line right into the Holocene (at 11,500 years ago).

volcanoes ... standard theory awry?

In this instance, mainstream theory is being revised in a mainstream kind of way - the story is at http://phys.org/print329398219.html

Ozone scare being revived

At http://wattsupwiththat.com/2014/09/12/un-global-warming-propaganda-campa... ... the attempt to keep the CAGW bandwagon rolling is changing tack as we approach this year's Climate Summit in New York, the annual bean feast which sees the draining of lots of wine bottles and the talking themselves senseless. They are under pressure as the world has stopped warming and the cat is out of the bag. Hence, the latest wheeze.

On a Plait

George Howard takes another pop at Phil Plait and his 'consensus science rules' blog after he had a go at Chandra Wickramasinghe and the theory of Panspermia. George considers Panspermia to be a friendly cousin of neo-catastrophism and worthy of defence on the same grounds. Both subjects endure a lot of criticism, especially by people such as Plait who instinctively disapprove and oppose new ideas as if it is an affront on them personally rather than a different way of looking at things, in the spirit of science.