Rosetta Update

At http://phys.org/print329062105.html ... ESAs Rosetta mission has found the comet is 'unusually' dark and there is no sign, as yet, of water ice. It's a lump of rock - apparently.

Contrasts in Climate Science points of view

At http://dailycaller.com/2014/09/02/study-the-lower-troposphere-has-not-wa... ... a new paper by Ross McKitrick of the University of Guelph in Canada, claims there has been no warming of the lower troposphere for the last 26 years (the length of the satellite record). It is, of course, a computer simulation of data, a statistical exercise if you like, but contradicts almost everything that alarmists have been squawking about over the same time period.

Solar Activity

At www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/09/140903104743.htm ... an article in the Astrophysical Journal, 2014:792 (1) 'Deciphering Solar Magnetic Activity' - and based on NASA images and data, tells us a little more about how the Sun ticks. Roughly, every 11 years, the Sun switches from a stable and fairly quiet situation into a violently active one, which is the solar maximum. At this time there are numerous sun spots and eruptions of radiation and solar particles that are ejected around the solar system.

Outliers

At http://malagabay.wordpress.com/2014/09/02/catastrophic-dendrochronology/ ... Tim Cullen introduces the concept of catastrophic outliers in dendro constructs that are artefacts of the smoothing process within calibration of tree rings and C14. It is a remarkable insight into what may or may not be what happened during the construction of the modern dating system so faithfully relied upon by archaeologists, historians, and various others - including anthropologists (in the previous post).

Another brick out of the wall

At www.sfgate.com/news/article/Study-claims-cave-art-made-by-neanderthals-5... ... some lines scratched into rock inside Gorham's Cave on Gibraltar are said to prove Neanderthals were more cognitive that consensus theory allows. This is another brick out of the wall of an attitude formed in the 19th century with the discovery of Neanderthals in Germany.

Parch marks in the grass

Sophisticated technology fails - human acumen wins out. Perhaps the technology is not sophisticated enough - and with geophysics that is probably a fact. These machines cost big money and all archaeological departments have them - and most amateur archaeology groups do too. The point to consider - is too much reliance and faith put in their results. At www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-28967538 ... an English Heritage worker spotted parch marks in the grass at Stonehenge.

Eskimos

At http://news.sciencemag.org/archaeology/2014/08/strange-history-north-ame... ... it seems archaeologists are trying to make sense of various Arctic migration patterns across the top of N America. We are told, a culture known as Palaeo-Eskimo, lived in the region between 5000 years ago and 700 years ago. These appear to be the people catalogued by Moe Mandelkehr in one of his SIS articles, bringing our attention to geographically long migrations in the wake of his 2300BC event.

Ani

At http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08/ani-ruins-reveal-hi... ... we have some nice pictures of Ani, an ancient 5000 year old Armenian settlement. At a recent symposium historian Sezai Yazici said a lot of underground features had been found such as secret water channels, monk's cells, meditation rooms, corridors, tunnels with traps and corners designed to thwart intruders, and various other underground structures more difficult to tie down.

First Kansas

At http://phys.org/print328513988.html ... artifacts from a very early period of human activity have been found - Clovis and Pre-Clovis. The deciding factor will in the dating of sediment samples associated with the remains. It is yet to be confirmed they are more than 13,500 years old. This is before the Younger Dryas and deep within the warm period immediately following the end of the Ice Age - which occurred contemporary with the Oldest Dryas Event.

New paper on the Younger Dryas

I was sure there had been a pre-publication version of this paper in the Journal of Geology but I can't find it now. Another paper on the Younger Dryas event just emphasizes the insistence of the YDB team in keeping their theory afloat - in spite of a series of critical papers that have attempted to debunk the claims.