Isle of Wight Pterodactyl

3 Jun 2020

At www.heritagedaily.com/2020/05/chinese-pterodactyl-wings-its-way-to-the-u... ... Britain's first pterodactyl fossil, a jawbone in fact, was found by a fossil hunter on the Isle of Wight (near Sandown). It is closely related to a Chinese toejarid (a toothles pterodactyl with a brightly coloured crest). The Isle of Wight has emerged as something of a fossil graveyard for Cretaceous dinosaurs and their ilk. Lots of them have been found.

Over in Nevada we have a 246 million year old pregnant ichthyosaur - fossilised in situ ...

   ... see https://phys.org/news/2020-05-nevada-home-246m-year-old-fossil-pregnant.... ... it was found in the Augusta Mountains east of Reno. The fossil ichthyosaur was located at an elevation of 6000 feet. This is not the first time a pregant ichthyosaur has been found in these mountains - and may be telling us something about the manner of the fossilisation process (rapid).

At www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/sixty-mammoths-discovered-in-mexico-18... ... the number of bones of mammoth is likely to increase to hundreds as they are barely into digging out the site - bones buried in mud and debris. Smithsonian add a new dimension to the story. They say they were killed by human hunters who used the muck to their advantage - assuming they were killed in marshy ground on the edge of a lake. The idea, as it is basically a hypothesis that arose out of some inner need to explain the site, is related to the discovery of pits with bones - six miles distant. The claim is that several of the bones in the pits contain cut marks - evidence of human butchering of carcasses. Identifying cut marks is all a bit of a leap of faith as such markings on animal bones could arise from being washed along in turbulent waters. No doubt human hunters did butcher mammoth but not in the region of hundreds of them. The Palaeolithic wasn't exactly teeming with very hungry people, looking out for an elephant burger. It  later emerges this is an hypothesis - based on an assumption. The site has all the marks of a catastrophic event. 

See the earlier post  https://www.sis-group.org.uk/news/lots-mammoths.htm