In The News

Welcome to our "In the News" page, featuring summaries of Internet news, relevant to Catastrophism and Ancient History.

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24 Jun 2011
Atlas of Empires

Atlas of Empires by Peter Davidson tells a tale of how and why the great empires of history flourished but inevitably fell and explains what this might mean to our current globalised world. The driving forces that gave impetus to the empires are examined in detail - belief systems, culture, trade networks, warfare in their time etc.

24 Jun 2011
When scientists and the powers that be get miffed by the little people

An interesting story at www.physorg.com/print227783739.html where scientists working on genetic modification and improved seed research associated with the 'green revolution' in the hope of inventing the Mark 2 version have pubicly criticised a spot of down to earth on the ground and get your hands dirty bit of homespun improvised rice growing improvements that began life in Madagascar under the auspices of a priest.

24 Jun 2011
Upstairs ...

It seems that elliptical galaxies are not spherical as once thought but disc shaped and resemble spiral galaxies. This result came from Atlas 3D and was published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (in June) (see www.physorg.com/print227770886.html).

24 Jun 2011
Steam rising as the sea level hockey stick is published, in pronto timescales

Over at http://climateaudit.org/2011/06/22/pnas-reviews-preferential-standards-f... ... Steve McIntyre is critical not just at the ease at which the Team paper went through peer review at PNAS, in stark contrast to their treatment of Lindzen (see post a week ago) but the contents itself - which he thinks are misleading. For example, the proxy data has been smoothed by Bayesian methodology - in a way statisticians would not encourage. It seems they also exclude sea level data before AD1000 yet claims it is a seal level record over the last 2000+ years.

24 Jun 2011
Ice Age humans

A story at www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-13846262?print=true seems to indicate the first modern humans, the Gravettian culture, entered Europe from the Russian plains rather than through the Balkans. Why this might be so is not discussed, as such, as the evidence comes from a cave in the Ukraine - and presumably no such early evidence yet exists in the Balkans. Still, it does give weight to the idea the steppe zone, which in the Ice Age was a band running from Iberia to NE Siberia, was an idea location for human hunters to thrive. 

24 Jun 2011
Ocean life - richness and decline

t www.physorg.com/print227957170.html ... a parcel of marine scientists, or rather, a collection of environmentalists, is warning us the world's oceans are at risk of entering a period of extinction as a result of, wait for it - a hit including pollution, acidification, ocean warming, overfishing and deoxygenation. The findings are shocking said an Oxford University chap who happens to be the scientific director of the International Programme on the State of the Oceans (oodles of tax money then).

24 Jun 2011
A hominid tooth that is 17 million years of age

Bones found in Wasden cave, a few miles west of Idaho Falls (in the State of Idaho) (see www.idahopress.com/news/state/scientist-fights-for-research-at-e-idaho-c...). Archaeologists, or palaeontologists, have never explored the caves systematically and this is a plea for funds - which are unlikely to be forthcoming. There are bones from all kinds of animals, from the size of mice to that of mammoth - and lots of bison. Mixed in with the bones are prehistoric spear and arrow points and fragments of pottery.

21 Jun 2011
Giving birth to the sea level hockey stick

Amazingly, after the mess the AGW 'Team' got themselves into over the temperature hockey stick model, climate scientists have produced another progeny - this time with sea levels (see http://wattsupwiththat.com/2011/06/20/manns-new-sea-level-hockey-stick-p... ).

21 Jun 2011
Update on Egyptian crowns

Over at www.gks.uk.com/egyptian-crowns-chaos/ there is an update

20 Jun 2011
Odd Mercury

Mercury isn't a bit like it was supposed to be. NASAs Messenger spacecraft shows craters on the planet that are deep and cold enought to hold frozen water - but Mercury is the rock closest to the Sun. Images of other regions indicate large eruptions have taken place - which somehow they can date to 3.7 billion years ago. When journalists or press releases express these numbers with such certainty one can't help being amused - but then again someone must have fed them the information. Craters are in fact thought to be buried beneath the lava - or basalt floor of the planet.