Anthropology news

Jewish Origins

At www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100603123207.htm genome analysis has probed Jewish genetics - or distinctly Jewish populations (see American Journal of Human Genetics June 2010). The idea is to find out if there is a distinctly Jewish race - which is a bit of a stupid question as Judaism is a religion and must embrace more than one strand of human genetics.

Genetic research in Africa

At www.upenn.edu/pennnews/news/penn-researchers-add-genetic-data-archaeology.html there is a report, or news flash, about genetic research they hope will shed light on the demographic history of Africa as it is now known from anthropology, archaeology, and linguistic studies, and it is being published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. It is nice to read some research which does not mention global warming.

Diminutive humans in trees

At http://news.discovery.com/human/get-ready-for-more-proto-humans.html May 24th ... there is a story of another hominid addition to the human fossil bank, Homo gautengensis. Found in South Africa and just 3 feet tall it spent a lot of time in trees and had big teeth adapted to chewing plant material. The past few years have witnessed a lot of new discoveries and it seems anthropologists have in the possession bones that await study and clarification.

Neanderthals and Genes.

Science Daily May 6th (see www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100506141559.htm ) the fossil record indicates modern humans differ physically from Neanderthals.

Reachable Stars

In Reachable Stars: Patterns in Ethno-astronomy of Eastern North America, George Langford, University of Alabama Press: 2007. Ethno-astronomy is one of those amusing word constructs that is basically a woolly way of describing star based Native American myths and legends. Anyway, it is a compilation of stories that took many years to pull together.

Human Origins

One of the big consensus theories is that human origins are closely bound up with the Out of Africa theory. Conventional science outlets and the popular media, such as the BBC, constantly cite the theory as fact as if there was no alternative anthropological ideas. The theory is especially vexious to some as it assumes a pure Homo sapiens strain migrated out of the African continent at some point between 100,000 and 50,000 years ago and all other human groups, including Neanderthals for example, or Homo erectus, have no imput in modern genes.

Dating anomalies

Science News (www.sciencenews.org/view/generic/id58346 ) April 16th ... new age estimates for Homo erectus fossils from Java have produced puzzling results. Anthrolopologists thought Homo erectus had survived on Java until 30,000 years ago - but the new dating method indicates they died out much earlier. The difference is due to the application of differing dating methodologies.

This Week in Science

This Week in Science April 8th (Science volume 328 issue 5975) ... our genus Homo is thought to have evolved a little more than 2 million years ago from the earlier hominid Australopithecus - but there are few fossil remains that can inform us about the transition. Two skeletons found in a cave in South Africa, it is hoped, will provide more information on the subject as they belong to a new species of Australopithecus.

Out of Africa - new episode

At www.english.globalarabnetwork.com April 9th ... a British archaeologist, Jeremy Rose, has found evidence of human settlement in Oman at 125,000 years ago. However, there is a caveat not mentioned but discernible by reading between the lines.

Anglo Dutch relationships 300,000 + years ago

See www.rnw.nl/english/print/73299 ... amateur archaeologist Pieter Stoel has found splinters and cores of flint that are thought to date back 370,000 years ago. They were sucked out of a sump pit at a depth between 27 and 36m (in the Netherlands). On the opposite side of the North Sea basin, at Pakefield in Suffolk, 225km from Woerden, a similar discovery has been made, suggesting people walked across the North Sea sea bed, which was dry land during the Ice Ages (but drowned during the interglacials).