Archaeology news

Footprints in Normandy

At https://anthropology.net/2019/09/10/80000-year-old-le-rozel-footprints-i... ... French archaeologists have unearthed 257 Neanderthal footprints and 8 hand prints from a layer of fine dark sand deposited around 80,000 years ago, it is believed. The site is at Le Rozel in Normandy. They appear to represent evidence Neanderthals lived in groups much like modern day hunter gatherers ...

Indo Euro Roots

DNA study illuminates South and Central Asian ancestryh - so it is said (go to https://phys.org/news/2019-09-largest-ever-ancient-dna-illuminates-mille... ... which includes the origins of the Indus Valley population. It is being broadcast, it would seem, as the largest ever ancient study to date, yet it is really still a very small random sample from diverse parts of the wider region. Some 524 human remains spread over a long period of time are what they say is a bumper genetic study. What it does show is that people were moving about - over long distances.

Mississippi Site

At https://phys.org/news/2019-08-archaeologist-unearths-history-mississippi... ... the archaeology of the Mississippi River Valley is becoming clearer in spite of the intense agriculture taking place, now and in the past. The Mound Culture is involved - and at the link we have one archaeologists view of how it all came about.

Biblical War

Archaeologists have invoked a Biblical war to explain a destruction layer - go to www.livescience.com/alter-tells-story-of-biblical-war.html ... which is a projection. A 2800 year old inscribed altar stone found in a Moabite sanctuary in what is now the kingdom of Jordan, seems to shed some light on the conflict between Israel and Moab. The latter apparently rebelled against Israel, which had temporarily seized control of the Transjordan zone, under the Omride dynasty.

Coopers Ferry

Excavations at Coopers Ferry in western Idahoe suggest people were living in that area 16,000 years ago. The arrival time continues to be pushed backwards . See https://phys.org/news/2019-08-artifacts-people-north-america-earlier.html ...

Roopkund Lake

At https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2019/08/biomolecular-analyse... ... a study published in Nature Communications (August 2019) concerns the mysterious skeletons of Roopkund Lake in the Himalayan mountains - or foothills. It was initially thought they all died in a single catastrophic event - but analysis seems to show they died in two different events, one thousand years apart. The lake is shallow and has attracted attention due to the presence of skeletal remains of humans from what is thought to amount to several hundred bones.

Solent Archaeology

At https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2019/08/mesolithic-boat-buil... ... some years ago a boat building site going back 8000 years ago was found in the Solent - during what is known as the Mesolithic era (pre-farming). The Solent is the estuary leading into Southampton and its entrance is behind the Isle of Wight. In fact, Bouldnor Cliff is on the island and the remains were found at the foot of the cliff - most of the Solent having been robbed of its archaeology by the daily tides.

Jehu and Jehoram

Important paper ar AOSIS (ISSN: 2072-8050 or go to https://doi.org/10.4102/hts.v75i3.5326 ... from the department of Old Testament Studies, faculty of theology and religion, University of Pretoria in South Africa. Authors given are Lerato Mokoena and Esias Meyer.

Boyne to Brodgar

At https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2019/08/archaeologists-disco... ... the 'Boyne to Brodgar' project has come up with around 40 previously unknown monuments in the vicinity of Newgrange - including one that aligns with water solstice sun rise and predates Newgrange. The sites range from the early Neolithic, around 4000BC, until the Bronze and Iron Ages, even as late as the early medieval period. The survey made use of satellite baseed remote sensing, drones, airborne laser scanning and geophysics.

Spanish Bronze Age Building

At https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2019/08/spanish-archaeologis... ... a large building dating to the middle of the Spanish Bronze Age (between 2100 and 1500BC) is associated with new settlers who established themselves on a craggy hillside, or cliff, at what is known as La Cava. It measures 70 square metres and is surrounded by a settlement (houses) and rampart and there is also some strange holes carved out of the base rock. The site was later used by Christian hermits.