Archaeology news

Fossils and Things

At http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.co.uk/2014/09/exceptionally-well-... ... concerns insect fossils found in rocks in the Rhone Valley, in limestone outcrops. A new species has been found, a water treader - the kind of aquatic bug you might find in a garden pond. Now, limestone is consider to have an origin in shallow sea locations such as lagoons and the Rhone Valley limestone has lots of fish and marine shells and even plants that are assumed to have been washed into the tropical sea.

Parch marks in the grass

Sophisticated technology fails - human acumen wins out. Perhaps the technology is not sophisticated enough - and with geophysics that is probably a fact. These machines cost big money and all archaeological departments have them - and most amateur archaeology groups do too. The point to consider - is too much reliance and faith put in their results. At www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-28967538 ... an English Heritage worker spotted parch marks in the grass at Stonehenge.

Eskimos

At http://news.sciencemag.org/archaeology/2014/08/strange-history-north-ame... ... it seems archaeologists are trying to make sense of various Arctic migration patterns across the top of N America. We are told, a culture known as Palaeo-Eskimo, lived in the region between 5000 years ago and 700 years ago. These appear to be the people catalogued by Moe Mandelkehr in one of his SIS articles, bringing our attention to geographically long migrations in the wake of his 2300BC event.

Ani

At http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08/ani-ruins-reveal-hi... ... we have some nice pictures of Ani, an ancient 5000 year old Armenian settlement. At a recent symposium historian Sezai Yazici said a lot of underground features had been found such as secret water channels, monk's cells, meditation rooms, corridors, tunnels with traps and corners designed to thwart intruders, and various other underground structures more difficult to tie down.

First Kansas

At http://phys.org/print328513988.html ... artifacts from a very early period of human activity have been found - Clovis and Pre-Clovis. The deciding factor will in the dating of sediment samples associated with the remains. It is yet to be confirmed they are more than 13,500 years old. This is before the Younger Dryas and deep within the warm period immediately following the end of the Ice Age - which occurred contemporary with the Oldest Dryas Event.

Stone points, Bering Straits

Why did people fix stone tips on spears and arrows? Good question. What was the advantage over sharpened wood?

Zoroaster

Zoroastrianism is a very interesting faith as it involved fire temples - and apocalyptic ideas. It was the state religion of ancient Persia and ruthlessly suppressed by the Islamic ruling elite in the latter half of the first millennium AD. Archaeologists have found evidence of its practise in a remote region of NW China, in the Uigher Autonomous Region, in a tomb dated around 2500 years ago.

North Africa and the spread of early humans

Humans living in North Africa, including what is now the Sahara desert, are thought to have been at the vanguard of the Out of Africa movement, the consensus scenario of human origins. Modern humans, that is. They were ideally placed to enter Europe and western Asia. This fact can actually be turned on its head as North Africa is ideally placed for migration in the opposite direction, from Europe and western Asia into Africa, as happened during the Holocene period.

Gunnar Heinsohn and the first millennium AD

Gunnar Heinsohn and Trevor Palmer are currently locked into a debate that mainly centres around the conventional version of Roman history. Palmer is on the mainstream side, producing reams of evidence in support of his position, and Heinsohn, as is his want, is lobbing the occasional hand grenade to cause a splutter or two. Now, Heinsohn's ideas have been taken up by the redoubtable Tim Cullen and he has his own variation on it all - - go to http://malagabay.wordpress.com/2014/08/16/friends-romans-countrymen/ ...

Defending the consensus model

At http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08/discovery-suggests-... ... a set of tusks in a museum, once attached to a mastodon skull that was thrown overboard, ended up in the nets of fishermen from Chesapeake Bay, along with some stone tools. They have been stored away for some 40 years or so, in the dark recesses of a museum. The interesting thing about them is that the sea floor in which they were dredged up from is continental shelf that would have been dry land during the last Ice Age. It is the North American equivalent of the North Sea basin.