Catastrophism news

Gobekli Tepe

George Howard has uploaded an interesting video at http://cosmictusk.com/common-culture-embraces-the-younger-dryas-boundary... ... which is worth watching. When did civilisation really begin?

Mons Olympus and the three volcanoes on Mars

Emilio Spedicato is a well known figure in catastrophist circles and over the years has come up with some very good ideas. Over at www.q-mag.org/the-pyramids-of-giza-the-belt-of-orion-and-three-volcanoes... ... he has come out with an alternative to the Bauval and Gilbert interpretation of the lay-out of the three main pyramids in Egypt. Apparently, La Violette and others have claimed they do not exactly match the alignment of the three stars in the Belt of Orion and therefore our friend and his associates looked around for an alternative astronomical phenomenon.

Yucatan Pop

At http://phys.org/print344769202.html ... evidence of a massive tsunami wave that struck the eastern side of the Yucatan Peninsular has been found. It is claimed it occurred 1500 years ago, at some point after AD450. It could have been caused by an underwater land slip, a Caribbean volcano, an earthquake, or a meteorite strike. No chance of knowing. Even the date is wide open as it is presently dated somewhere between 450 and 900AD. It requires a more secure dating analysis, using C14 on sediments from above and below the tsunami level.

The year of 365AD

This is the year of a big earthquake in the central Mediterranean area, an earthquake that produced a tsunami wave that caused widespread destruction as far afield as Cyprus and Egypt. It is described graphically by the Roman historian Ammianus Marcellus - see for starters www.q-mag.org/what-happened-on-july-21-365-a-d.html

under the water hazels

At www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/uk-weather-storms-expose-ancient... ... in February of last year the spring storms near Penzance in Cornwall uncovered tree stumps from between 4000 and 6000 years ago (C14 dates). There are forest beds west of Penzance, at Wherry Town, and to the east of Penzance, at Chyandour. They were therefore submerged either at the 3000BC or the 2300BC events (it would seem the more likely). In addition there are the remains of submerged woodland in Mounts Bay and at Portreath Beach, and also in Daymer Bay.

another submerged forest, this time in the Wash

The Wash is a geographical feature in case anyone reading this is not aware of UK topography. It adjoins the Fens, a vast tract of marshland (now drained) on the North Sea coast, and when Dogger Land was in existence this whole area would have been at a higher elevation to the sea level of the period. There is plenty of evidence, geologically, that the Fens, during most of the Holocene, were high and dry.

Catastrophe at 6150BC

At www.q-mag.org/moss-betrays-the-season-of-the-storegga-event/ ... which is the well known Storegga tsunami that was triggered by a submarine landslide in the upper portion of the North Sea, off the coast of Norway. Sand deposits overlie the remains of coastal settlements in both Norway and Scotland. The event is dated at 8150 years ago - right on the button of an event that had global repercussions in climate change and the drowning of Sunda Land in SE Asia.

2300BC and Mongolia

At http://phys.org/print339752858.html ... a Chinese and US team have found evidence that parts of Inner Mongolia that were assumed to have been desert for millions of years, were not. The region may have dried up as recently as just over 4000 years ago - which means the 2300BC event may have been responsible (see various SIS articles by Moe Mandelkehr who produced evidence from geology, palaeo-climate, and archaeology for a global event at that point in time - which would have included Mongolia).

the article that never was

SIS was, quite a few years ago now, on the way to publish an article on Dodwell's famous 'curve' - where he claimed to be able to track the last time the axis of rotation of the Earth had changed. The original article, at that time, was in the safe hands of Adelaide University, and his family had expressed the wish that his work was not taken out of context.

typhoon capers

At www.sciencenews.org/article/super-typhoon-shoved-supersized-boulder ... we learn that the devastating typhoon that struck the Philippines in November of last year (2013)was so powerful a wave pushed a huge boulder 9m wide and 180 metric tones in weight, up on to the beach. The story is in a paper read at the December 2014 AGY annual meeting in San  Francisco (prior to publication in a suitable journal). It is said to the biggest known rock to have been moved by a giant wave of water - during a storm.