Catastrophism news

Pole Shift

At https://arxiv.org/pdf/physics/0604029v2.pdf ... we have an interesting paper by Woelfli and Baltensperger, 'Ancient East Siberia had a lower latitude in the Pleistocene' ... they begin by outlining their reasons why they think eastern Siberia was warmer in the Pleistocene than it is in the modern world by focussing on the mammoths and other large herbivores, also making note of the fact that Lake Baikal does not seem to have frozen over and its fauna is proof of that (which is generally accepted).

Microbial Mayhem

At https://phys.org/news/2020-01-microbial-mayhem-chicxulub-crater.html ... it was microbial mayhem in the Chicxulub crater - according to a paper published in the journal Geology (https://doi.org/10.1130/G46799.1 ) and in fact this was due to a rapid reinvigoration of microbial life in the aftermath of the asteroid strike ...

Crater

Sent in by William and by Gary, and Robert as well. Ay www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-7868821/ ... a crater has been uncovered that was left behind by what is described as a giant meteor that is thought to have hit the Earth around 800,000 years ago. In other words, during the Pleistocene geological period. The meteor has been suspected for many years but the site of its crater has remained elusive. It is now said it exists under a thick layer of volcanic lava on the Bolaven Plateau in Laos.

Earth's Rotational Quirks

At www.forbes.com/sites/trevornace/2017/11/20/earths-rotation-is-mysterious... ... back in 2017 we were told at Forbes that scientists think 2018 and 2019 might turn out to be years in which earthquakes were more frequent as earth's rotation has a habit of slowing down, and speeding up again. The expectation derives from a piece of research on earthquake frequency since 1900. It was found they peaked at roughly 32 year intervals. Subsequently, this was traced back to fluctuations in earth's rotation rate.

Fossil Shells

At https://phys.org/news/2019-12-fossil-shells-reveal-global-mercury.html ... concerns fossil oyster shells found in Alabama (along the Tombigbee River) among other diverse locations. They date back 66 to 72 million years ago - on the cusp of the K/T boundary event (but dated a few million years earlier). We are, it seems, back to that hoary old chestnut, a geochronological failure in managing end of Cretaceous sediments with the Chicxulub crater (and the thin line of iridium which is used as a marker point amid a sea of sedimentation layering).

Tropical Ice Striation

At https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2019/12/sailing-stone-track-... ... a sand  stone slab which contains dinosaur footprints seems to also have marks suggesting a 'sailing stone' or 'walking rock' according to paleontologist Paul Olsen. This was a feature of the recent American Geophysical Union conference (December 2019). The striations on the  'sailing stone' are said to be evidence of a freezing event in what are now the tropics - 200 million years ago.

Meteor Bombardment

Gary sent in this link to www.dailymail.co.uk/science-tech/article-7733203/ ... earth's rocky surface is the result of meteor bombardment as a result of extraterrestrial impacts smashing into the surface of the earth. Billions of years ago is of course. That is where the goal posts are - for whatever reason. A new study has been looking for an explanation for the onset of Plate Tectonics. They came to the conclusion that a bombardment of meteors and other space debris could have kick started the process.

Hyenas in Yukon

At www.vice.com/en_uk/article/j5wnx7/ancient-bone-crushing-hyena-roamed-the... ... hyenas, during the Ice Age, lived between Mexico and the Yukon, in the far north. Ice Age hyenas are said to have lived in the Arcitc - the assumption being that the geoid of the Earth has remained unchanged. Hyena fossils are sometimes found in the UK (in cave deposits for example) but the Yukon example involved three teeth found back in the 19760s.

did an extraterrestrial impact ...

Sent in by William - go to https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2019/10/did-extraterrestrial... ... did an extraterrestrial impact trigger the extinction of Ice Age animals? Which is a revival of the Younger Dryas Boundary event hypothesis. The mainstream view is that an ice dam, that had wonderfully survived for thousands of years, left behind by retreating ice, held back a giant lake of cold water which burst and spilt that glacial water into the North Atlantic - cooling the ocean currents and creating the Younger Dryas.

Tree Pellets

Robert sent in the links below and once again, a good one as far as catastrophism is concerned - go to https://dornsife.usc.edu/news/stories/3095/sediments-sequester-carbon-fr... and https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2019/10/15/1913714116/tab-figures-data ... and also one caught up in the co2 bubble (but don't worry as the core information is all we are interested in).