Catastrophism news

Fire from the Sky

Yes, it seems fire can rain out of the sky - that is what mythology appears to be saying - go to www.thunderbolts.info/wp/2014/07/02/burning-questions-2/ ... another exciting post by Rens Van Der Sluijs. The universality of myths involving fire raining out of the sky is remarkable. Was it actual fire - or great heat as in blast (an exploding bolide). The Egyptian goddess Sekhmet, a variation on Isis and Hathor, specifically caused fire to fall out of the sky - somewhat like the Indian goddess Kali.

Irish mythology

Patrick McCafferty was a speaker at an SIS autumn meeting a few years ago - and came across as somebody to watch. It seems he has teamed up with Dallas Abbot over in the States and they have made a programme for the Smithsonian Channel, a documentary concerning the mysterious history of Ireland in the 6th century AD - go to http://cosmictusk.com/irish_history_myth_comet_asteroid_mccaffferty/

The Dark Matter and the Dinosaur Demise

Dark matter meets catastrophism - courtesy of Harvard University researchers. At http://phys.org/print322123461.html ... a new theory is being aired and it involves a disc of dark matter at the heart of our galaxy - and presumably every galaxy. A group of Harvard researchers from the physics department have put forward a proposal, a gestating hypothesis, that began with the object that struck the Earth and wiped out three quarters of all species in the dinosaur era. It seeks an answer - where did this object originate.

The Eocene Mass Extinction event

At www.livescience.com/46312-popigai-crater-linked-eocene-mass-extinction.html .... this is one of those events normally attributed to climate change rather than catastrophism - mainly because joining up the dots between dating and geological chronology is riven with assumptions and elusions of accuracy. Climate did change towards the end of the Eocene - but is that a consequence rather than a cause?

Geology, glaciology, and climate change

At http://notrickszone.com/2014/06/09/giant-of-geologyglaciology-christian-... ... and sidestepping the blowback and snake oil of climate science, Christian Schluechter has some interesting things to say about glaciers in the Alps over the last 10,000 years. For example, the Swiss geologist found chunks of wood at the edge of a glacier in the 1990s. Laboratory analysis revealed it was 4000 years old. He went on to find multiple wood fragments of the same, or nearly the same, age.

Landscape fires in N America at the end of the Pleistocene

At http://cosmictusk.com/big-burn-north-american-great-plains-underlain-by-... ... George Howard provides the full paper to read (published in Nature Geoscience on May 25th, 2014. It is five pages long and derives from the University of Wisconsin. Basically, it is telling us the transition from the Pleistocene to the Holocene is characterised by contintental wide wild fires. See the image above - the Brady layer in the Midwest.

Clovis Man and Mammoth elephant

At http://craterhunter.wordpress.com/2014/05/10/mapping-clovis-man-vs-mammo... ... is a guest post by Steve Garcia who regularly comments at George Howard's web site, Cosmic Tusk. Garcia is very keen on the Younger Dryas Boundary Event and is keen to undermine one of its critics, Surovell. The latter has written or co-authored several major articles that attempted to debunk the YDB event (which Garcia considers as poor science). He therefore had a look at non-YDB articles that co-authored Surovell and found the one that he takes to pieces here.

Nudging the axis of rotation

Velikovsky, in his Epilogue to Worlds in Collision, page 367, speculates on what might cause the axis of rotation to tilt. He was trying to think up a mechanism to explain the Long Day of Joshua which probably had nothing to do with an axial shift. One idea, he suggested, was that the Earth might pass through a strong magnetic field at an angle to the Earth's magnetic axis.

Years without a Summer

Archaeopress, the publishers of the SIS Cambridge Conference Proceedings organised by Benny Peiser and featuring Euan MacKie, Duncan Steel, Amos Nur, and others, at just £18 per download (the printed version costs an arm and a leg, and part of the pelvis too) has another interesting download (again, at £18, a reasonable price as a book would fetch much more than that), The Years Without Summer; tracing AD 536 and its aftermath' Joel D Gunn (170 pages with maps, charts and line drawings) - go to www.archaeopress.com

Sumerian comet impact

It seems someone else has had a go at decyphering the fragmentary tablet K8538 - and the claim is that it describes an impact event in the Tigris-Euphrates marshes. At www.knowledgeminer.eu/climate_papers.html ... Seifert and Lemke suggest it describes an event that took place in 2200BC. The tablet itself is dated 1500 years later - but they say it is a copy of an older version. The last decypherment of this tablet claimed an impact in the Alps was being recorded.