Catastrophism news

Andrew Hall

Thunderbolts this month also has a piece by one Andrew Hall, described as an engineer and writer. He is clearly somebody with his feet on the ground.

Black Sea flood

The Ryan and Pitman claim (back in 1997) that the Black Sea was flooded when a rock sill at the Bosporus was breached and salt water from the Mediterranean gushed into the freshwater lake system of the Black Sea and changed its composition for ever, dating the event around 8000 years ago (or slightly earlier) caused a bit of a stir, to put it mildly. The response was multi-pronged - even the Creationists were against the proposal.

under the waves

The ancient geography of the Mediterranean Basin has been profoundly changed by sea level rise following the Late Glacial Maximum. This global event led to the retreat of coastlines as a result of water locked up as ice - or that is the way it is usually explained and  visualised by scientists and lay-people alike. Frozen water led to the emergence of vast areas of continental shelf and islands that are now submerged features on the sea bed.

landscape fires

Keenan describes the 2300BC event as perhaps the most significant event in the Holocene - since the end of the Ice Ages. Presumably he means the Younger Dryas event rather than the end of the Late Glacial Maximum. This appears to diminish the 6200BC event on his part - but then again it is not exactly high on everyone's radar.

2300BC event

At http://arxiv.org/abs/physics/9908052v2 ... this is a pre-publication review of a paper co-authored by Douglas Keenan. The title is, 'The Three Century climatic upheaval at c2000BC, and regressed radiocarbon disparities' ... which may set the cat among the pigeons (over C14 dates) and shine a light on an interesting episode in history.

our models tell us ...

At http://phys.org/print358679794.html ... we have one of those classic model studies that claim they have produced a 'cutting edge statistical analysis' which shows humans were responsible for the mass die-offs of animals over the last 70,000 years - which includes sabre toothed tigers as well as mammoths and woolly rhinoceros, giant sloths and giant armadilloes etc. Quite apart from having giant appetites, why would humans kill off all the prey species - out of devilment?

stagnant Arctic waters

A study, just published in the journal Science (August, 2015) has been looking at the circulation of water in the Arctic Ocean and Nordic seas - and how it compares between today and the last Ice Age. See http://phys.org/print358682877.html

Kokei

Enoshima is an island at the mouth of a river on Japan's coast about 40 miles SE of the capital, Tokyo. Kokei, a Buddhist monk living in the 11th century AD, became interested in the river, as he had noticed similarities between catastrophic events associated with the ancient Sarasvati River in India (the Indus Valley) and catastrophic events that occurred on the Japanese river dating from some time between 537 and 552AD. Kokei considered the Japanese events to be a miniature version of the Sarasvati tale of destruction that goes back to the late 3rd millennium BC.

linguacatastrophica

Another interesting web site (or blog) you might want to look at - http://linguacatastrophica.blogspot.co.uk

There is another one, a sort of forum set up or notice board, at https://cassiopaea.org/forum/index.php?topic=33985.840 ... on historical database that uses Josepthus to discuss the raash of Uzziah and various other earthquakes (are also discussed).

tied in knots

At http://phys.org/print358144586.html .... the end of Permian extinction event resulted in the demise of 90 per cent of marine life. It is thought that ocean venting played a role, releasing hydrogen sulphide that wiped out the dominant form of life at the time and allowed a minority form to become the majority thereafter.