Catastrophism news

Mass extinction events and dinosaurs

At https://phys.org/print443093224.html ... not only were dinosaurs eliminated by a catastrophic event at the K/T boundary 66 million years ago but they evolved into a successful species after the Permian mass extinction event 245 million years ago. Now we are being told but dinosaurs were but one of several successful species for around 13 million years - until another extinction event, 232 million years ago. After this event dinosaurs were able to expand very quickly. It is known as the Cernian Pluvial Episode.

Arctic Ice Shelf

An article in Nature Communications (April 2018) suggests that a Eurasian ice sheet did not extend into the Arctic Ocean during the Late Glacial Maximum. This is distinctly different to an earlier glaciation event where an ice shelf larger than Greenland once existed in the Arctic Ocean, so big it has left its evidence of existence on the sea bed - particularly on the Lomonosov Ridge. Scour marks from glaciation seem to show the ice shelf rested directly on the sea bed - much like the Greenland glacier of today.

K/T again

Apparently, there are a lot of scientists out there that have reservations about the asteroid/ comet impact theory a the K/T boundary - see https://phys.org/print442051270.html ... and these mostly revolve around dating sedimentary layers on a uniformitarian time scale rather than on a catastrophic laying down of sediments (as one would have thought per an asteroid strike).

Triassic Reptiles

At https://phys.org/print441438532.html ... fossil crocodiles from the Cretaceous - how did they live and die. Uniformitarian fossilisation and how the process works. Juvenile and adult crocodile fossils in a Queensland deposit - found near the Outback town of Isisford (published by the Royal Society Open Science journal). Two of the crocodiles had a large proportion of their bones still intact - indicating they died near where they lived. We mighlt also add - indicating rapid fossilisation too.

Debunking Toba

This is the title of the piece at https://anthropology.net/2018/03/23/debunking-toba-catastrophe-theory/ ... it is true that catastrophism is not welcome as far as geology and human history is concerned and the fate of the Toba catastrophe is somewhat overdue if some recent studies are anything to go by. The super volcano Toba was first proposed by Stanley Ambrose - and it was popularised by Henry Harpending. In effect, it involved a genetic bottleneck at approximately 70,000 years ago that coincided with the massive eruption of the Toba volcano in Indonesia.

Rifting

At https://phys.org/print439805896.html ... core samples taken from the Mediterranean Sea at three different locations in the Gulf of Corinth provide a record of complex change in marine life and rift faulting in the region. The Corinth Gulf is thought to lie on an active Plate boundary although the term rift can apply to a fault zone. Earthquakes are common. Analysis of the cores came up with something else though and this is that the sea level in the Mediterranean has fluctuated on a number of occasions during the last half a million years.

Glaciers on Mountains

At www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-03/uow-gim030218.php ... we learn that the Gobi Altai mountain range in western Mongolia seems to conflict with the mainstream storyline of the last Ice Age. It is more or less an established fact that the northern hemisphere was deeply affected by the Ice Age advance during the Late Glacial Maximum, even though there is evidence of boats being used on the Arctic Ocean and great herds of herbivores were feeding in central Asia and Siberia, and apparently in Alaska as well.

Bloat and Float

At https://phys.org/print439043531.html ... one mystery of fossilised dinosaurs concerns the armour plated ankylosaurs. They are often discovered belly up. How does this happen? Out of 32 two fossil specimens from Alberta 26 were belly up. A recent study has worked out it was a case of bloat and float. They are usually found in river or water channel deposits and would have flopped over as a result of turbulent water flow.

Toba Failing

Seems like the Toba super volcano eruption 74,000 years ago is looking weaker. Not only is there evidence it had little to effect people in India we now have evidence of the same in eastern Africa. No sign of an environmental crisis it would seem. Go to http://popular-archaeology.com/issue/winter-2018/article/no-volcanic-win... ... but I suppose one might argue over the dating methodology that was used. Do they have evidence of a downturn at some other period?

Global volcanism and Chicxulub

Sea floor data point to a global volcanism event after the Chicxulub meteor crashed into the Yucatan peninsular - see https://phys.org/print437224338.html ... the highest peak of sea floor spreading (expansion of the sea floor) is deemed to have occurred at the same time as the Chicxulub meteor strike. That makes sense as recent investigations have shown how deep into the crust the asteroid penetrated. It caused massive magamatic activity - all around the world.