Catastrophism news

Ancient Destructions

The web site of Peter Jupp at http://ancientdestructions.blogspot.com has some interesting articles that members, I am sure, will be interested in reading. For example, 'Bad to the Bones' is based on Aboriginal mythology which appears to refer to gods associated in some sense with the sky, a once verdant landscape, and a catastrophe that brought it to an end (written by Rens van der Sluijs).

Thunderbolts

At www.thunderbolts.info July 10th ... we have a story about the birth of Aphrodite but rather than rising up out of the foam of the sea she appears to have merged out of a fiery furnace - in this instance, Aprhodite of myth (a goddess figure) is equated with the planet Venus. Hence, the story is really about discoveries made by the 'Venus Express' of the atmosphere of that planet. In addition, it concerns the Russian Venura class landing vehicles that revealed a rock strewn and sandy terrain - with a surface temperature of 500 degrees.

What ended the Ice Age?

www.physorg.com/print196687173.html June 25th ... scientists know the consensus theory is inadequate - which may come as a surprise to some. All  the textbooks are emphatic - it happened this way and they go on to describe in detail the consensus model of how it came about. The trigger was an orbital shift known as the Milankovitch Cycle. It caused more sunlight to fall across the northern half of the earth where the great ice sheets lay.

YD impact debate update

At http://cosmictusk.com we have a couple of stories on what is an ongoing debate - have scientists found evidence of a cosmic connection with the advent of the Younger Dryas or can the anomalies be explained by terrestrial based events. There is a critique of a paper by Pinter and Scott that claims carbon spherules of the type found in the black mat layer can also be found in forest fire incidents and therefore do not prove a cosmic origin for them.

Anasazi

At www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100609122842.htm June 10th ... a connection has been made between La Nina sea surface temperatures in the central Pacific Ocean and drought in western Europe and the SW region of North America and Mexico, in a paper published by Geophysical Research Letters. El Nino's affect weather systems, it is thought - and therefore so too must La Nina's.

Target: Earth

Member John Plaxton recommends Target: Earth, by Allen O Kelly and Frank Dachille, Pensacola Engraving Co: 1953 a book that was published at around the time of Velikovsky. It appears to be unavailable through Amazon so any member with more information, or a brief write-up of the contents, is welcome to get in touch via news [at] sis-group [dot] org [dot] uk

Cosmic Tusk update

At www.cosmictusk.com/deep-time-impact-induced-volcanism-a-colloquy is an exchange between Hermann Burchard and Han Kloosterman - with George Howard in the middle. Han calls Veilkovsky a 'scholar' rather than a 'scientist' and physicist Peter Warlow, a Velikovskian who came up with the tippetop theory, a valid model. Warlow was supposedly debunked by Slabinski and his paper was uncritically accepted - especially by Leroy Ellenberger (known to both Burchard and Kloosterman).

Comet Disintegration

At www.cosmictusk.com 'Smoke linked to Gun: Napier upheld by Nesvorny and Jenniskens on the Zodiacal Cloud' - George Howard has a pop at Richard Kerr of Science Magazine. The Zodiacal cloud, the consensus theory said, originated in colliding asteroids from the asteroid belt. Now Kerr, after reading Nesvorny and Jenniskens accepts an origin in comets - but blatantly avoids mentioning the Napier hypothesis and therefore ignores the implications. This seems to have riled George.

Ignimbrites

At http://sites.google.com/site/dragonstormproject/ is a blog devoted to a comet firestorm that contributed to the YD cooling event and faunal extinctions 13,000 years ago. He especially targets what is known as Ignimbrite geological formations found in the Chihuahua desert of northern Mexico - which he calls 'fire cloud rock'. They have the look of wet fast flowing concrete or lumpy mud in satellite images.

Zodiacal Glow

At www.physorg.com/print190569543.html ... Nesvorny and Jennisken in The Astrophysical Journal attribute the glow that straddles the night time zodiac in the eastern sky as sunlight scattered on dust particles - from  comets. More than 85 per cent of the dust, they say, originated from short period comets - not asteroids. In addition, snow in Antarctica is laced with micro-meteorites and 80 to 90 per cent of this comes from the same source.