Climate change news

36 years and counting

The Royal Society, that august body that is fond of admiring itself in the window and bending the forelock towards the upper echelons, mouthing platitudes and disregarding anything scientifically novel, has come up with an absolute classic. A professor of note doesn't know where Nepal, India and Pakistan get their drinking water.

rain in Scotland

Researchers from the University of New South Wales in Australia have been exploring a cave in Scotland, just to the north of Ullapool. They have been able to track cyclic changes in the North Atlantic Oscillation which affects climate in NW Europe. It confirms other studies - and even confirms dear old HH Lamb (all those years ago). By measuring the thickness of annual growth rings on five stalagmites taken from the Uamh an Tartair cave, a shallow cave beneath a blanket of peat, they were able to map out rainfall over a 3000 year period.

water, water, everywhere ...

EM Smith has been looking at water vapour in the air at http://chiefio.wordpress.com/2015/06/06/its-the-water-and-a-lot-more-vapor/ ... after sitting in his garden drinking some beer and feeling the heat of the Californian sun burning his skin. Heat is dry in California but when he was working in Florida last year, it was also hot, but humid - and he didn't burn.

NOAA has form

Going back to yesterday's climate change news and the new model analysis in a paper in the journal Science, we may note that NOAA has form as far as data manipulation is concerned, lowering temperatures in the past to make it seem temperatures are rising in recent years.

For the full exposure go to http://notrickszone.com/2015/06/01/bombshell-comprehensive-analysis-reve...

shape shifters

There I was a couple of days ago saying that mainstream climate science had accepted there was a hiatus or pause in global warming and hey presto, just in time for the Paris scare mongering festival in the autumn along comes NOAA, in collaboration with the journal Science, with an article saying the warming was there all along - but nobody could see it. They have achieved this by altering the data set.

Zbignew Jaworowski

Tim Cullen has another cracker at https://malagabay.wordpress.com/2015/05/29/the-ice-age-is-coming/ ... where the Ice Age refers to the assumption inter glacials last around 10,000 years in duration - and the Holocene is already that hoary.

old hat

At http://phys.org/print352015312.html ... it was the failure of the New Orleans levee system that caused the city to flood after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The flood walls along the city's principle drainage canals were inadequate - and a combination of factors was involved (not least the local political in play). It's a bit old hat but an in depth study into the flooding has just been completed - and has apportioned a great deal of blame on the US Army Corps of Engineers.

It's official, climate is nose diving

At http://phys.org/print352011250.html ... and https://tallbloke.wordpress.com/2015/05/28/global-climate-on-the-verge-o... ... we see that it has taken a decade for the consensus climate people to admit global warming has stalled - in spite of adjusted temperature data. Not only has it reached a plateau, so to speak, the first line of defence, it is actually cooling - and the story line is being taken up by more and more researchers jumping on the bandwagon with an eye on the post-co2 era and their jobs.

Antarctic and pullovers

There has been a steady rash of papers over the years that claim ice is receding in the Antarctic - and global warming is afoot, melting the ice to unsustainable levels (and a tipping point is approaching fast). Invariably this is a ploy whereby the authors are able to pull the wool over the eyes of the general public by being miserly with the facts. The expression above goes back to the days when we tended to wear pullovers in northern Europe and N America on nippy days outside in the fresh air.

around the journals, around the fringe

At http://phys.org/print350561270.html ... ocean acidification has been ruled out in the wake of the K/T boundary event (the end of Cretaceous extinction event). A paper in PNAS claims other factors must be looked for in order to account for the disappearance of so many marine life forms, such as ammonites and planktonic calcifera. The amount of soot and aerosols thrown up by the impact event is one avenue to explore - including intense and prolonged darkness.