Geology news

Death of the Dinosaurs

At https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2020/01/in-death-of-dinosaur... ... in death of the dinosaurs it was all about the asteroid - not the volcanoes. At last, some realism.  Yale assistant professor of geology and geophysics Pincilli Hull, and her colleagues, argue in a paper in the journal Sciencew, that environmental impacts from massive volcanic eruptions in India (the Deccan Traps) occurred beofe the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary and therefore did not contibute to the mass extinction of the dinosaurs.

Horses and Volcanoes

Robert sent in this link too - www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7890053/ ... which provides images from the recent eruption in the Phillippines. Robert says the gruesome images hint at the scale of catastrophism required to form fossils. In one image, below, we can see faint stratified layers in the volcanic deposit partiallly burying a horse - which gives an idea how polystrate fossils formed. Various other farm animals were also overcome by the hot ash and people seem to have fled leaving livestock behind. The horses had been used to carry tourists up to the summit for the view.

The Bahamas

At https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/37061/the-bahamas/ ... from NASA Eareth Observatory - east of Florida large swathes of the ocean glow peacock blue. They are this irridesence due to their shallow depths. The under water terrain is hilly and the crests of some of those hills comprise the islands of the Bahamas. In 2009 clear skies allowed NASAs Aqua satellite to take the picture below ...

Fossil Trove Colorado

This one is quite good and has even been picked up by Clark Whelton (on his email list). At https://phys.org/news/2019-10-fossil-trove-life-fast-recovery.html ... and concerns a fascinating fossil bed being investigated in Colorado which is said to date from not long after the K/T boundary event (which with a bit of twitching might even be said to have been laid down at the same time).

Iron Pyrites

This is a peculiar one - and comes courtesy of https://phys.org/news/2019-10-shelf-life-pyrite.html ... where we are informed the glacial cycles of the last couple of million years - a succession of cold periods interspersed with warm interglacials - may have an origin in the weathering of pyrite rocks. For knowledge of what pyrite actually is go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrite ... where we are told the mineral pyrite (also known as iron pyrites and quite commonly found in geological formations, including sediment layers). It is also known as fools gold and can form crystals.

Horses, and more Horses

Another good one from https://notrickszone.com/2019/10/10/during-the-last-ice-age-190-ppm-co2-... ... during the Late Glacial Maximum horses grazed in a forested landscape somewhat warmer than today's Arctic Alaska. In modern times the North Slope in Alaska, now north of the Arctic Circle, has a mossy tundra terrain and an absence of trees. Some 8 to 9000 years ago, the same region had both trees and many animal species that today lie 100s of km to the south.

Ausangate Mountain

Gary sent in this interesting link - from a couple of years ago. At www.forbes.com/sites/trevornace/2017/01/21/welcome-rainbow-mountains-per... (and see also https://theculturetrip.com/south-america/peru/articles/the-discovery-of-... ...). Ausangate Mountain in the Peruvian Andes - striped with colours ranging from turquoise and lavender to maroon and gold (or deep yellow). The mountain was holy to the Quechua people of Cusco and is still held in esteem.

Pearls and Meteors

William sent in the link https://eos.org/articles/glass-pearls-in-clam-shells-point-to-ancient-me... ... a story I do believe I noted a few weeks back - but never mind. It is a good one and worth repeating. Researchers suggest that spherical structures, smaller than grains of sand, may be microtektites. The story describes how they reached this decision after going through various other explanations. They were found in fossilised clams in a Florida quarry back in 2006 - so this is no quick investigation. .

Hadrosaurs and Turtles

At www.icr.org/article/11545/ ... Robert forwarded this interesting post - another mass kill event with an out of place dinosaur. Each time a fossilised creature with legs is found mixed up with fossil marine life there is a quandary. When the same situation repeats itself several times over it becomes even more of a quandary. The author of the piece is referring to the discovery of a new and relatively complete skeleton of a hadrosaur that has been found in Japan (the so called duck billed dinosaur).

Plate Tectonics

An interesting post at https://phys.org/news/2019-09-plate-tectonics.html .... where we are presented with a little history of the Plate Tectonics theory. It only goes back to the late 1960s and is therefore a relatively new idea to expalin certain geological features. It assumes the distribution and movement of plates, the uppermost layer of the Earth, is a fact of life - yet it doesn't seem to happen anywhere else in the solar system. Only on the Earth. Are we unique - our geology that is. Can we get our heads around it - truth or fiction ...