Geology news

Giant Earthquakes

At ... giant earthquakes are not as random as thought. Analysis of sediment cores from lakes in Chile show that EQs reoccur at regular intervals. It is only when smaller EQs are added that the incidents show up randomly in time. A Chilean EQ in 1960 had a magnitude of 9.5 and produced a massive tsunami wave that pummeled the coastal regions and caused a wave that travelled right across the Pacific to kill 200 people in Japan. Strong EQs produce underwater landslides which are preserved in sedimentary layers.

Scottish Submerged Forest

This story is again interesting as far as changing sea levels and ocean configuration is concerned. At ... archaeologists are surveying Scotland's submerged forests (rather, wooded regions under the waves). This seems to revolve around the Bay of Ireland in the Orkneys and Benbecula in the Outer Hebrides.

Vitiaz Arc

A study in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B (January 2018) have been looking at lizards in Australasia, Melanesia and Polynesia. We are told that when you scroll back the distribution of geckos, and their variants, they have a common ancestor that may go back to the Vitiaz Arc, a near continuous chain of islands that stretched across the Western Pacific 30 to 40 million years ago (during the Oligocene). Nowadays, the arc is represented by landforms such as the Philippines and a string of islands as far as Fiji.

oxydised iron

Diamonds with garnets can form at depths within Earth's Manetle. Earth scientists, it is said, made a discovery that 550km beneath the surface - oxydised iron. This is similar tro rust. It was found within garnets within diamonds - we are told. How does iron become rusty within the Mantle? One might point a finger at water in the Mantle - but not these guys. We know that iron exists as a metal in the core and Mantle - or so the mainstream songsheet assures us (and why not - a reasonable deduction).

The Big Brexit

I like the headline on this story - Britain's first departure from Europe (in this case a geological brexit) - go to ... which concerns a paper attempting to pin down when the chalk ridge between Calais and Dover was first breached. It is assumed a large glacial lake had formed during or at the end of the Anglian Ice Age in what is now the North Sea basin. This tudy proposes the breach came in two stages.

Tabular Flint

The seams of nodular and tabular flint at the base of the Upper Chalk on the South Downs were mined for axe production during the early Neolithic period (around 4000BC) whilst flint dug out of the 'clay and flints' and 'river terrace gravels' geology provided raw material of varying quality through the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age. In East Sussex, the clay and flints produced high quality nodules.


At ... international study identifies the process of rock formation by meteor strikes (or nuclear blasts). Nice headline but coesite is a polymath of silica that only forms under extremely high pressure -ten thousand times greated than normal atmospheric pressure. The presence of coesite indicates either that the material has pushed up through earth's crust from the Mantle - or that a comet or meteor struck the site. Lightning bolts as perceived by EU people are not mentioned.

Mega Flints

In the news section (written by Mike Pitts) of British Archaeology magazine (January 2018) we have the discovery of a big piece of flint at Avebury (at a farm) that is one of four described as mega flints (by the archaeologists). One image shows a flint in the lap of a male that is almost as big as his torso. It is basically a core that has been used for flint flakes - but still has lots of possibilities as the material to make lots more stone tools. Its size may indicate it was at one time valued - and may even have been at one time a heirloom.

Chesil Beach

I posted a story on the Chesil Beach a few years ago but now Gary has sent in a link to his web site that some readers may find interesting - go to ... I suppose if you take Velikovsky literally when it comes to stones falling out of the sky one might visualise Chesil Beach in Dorset as one such place where they might have landed - but there are an enormous number of stones there. However, this is not to dismiss Gary's article as it has a lot of information about the stones he has gleaned from various sources.

Havre Eruption

Robert sent in this link at ... a deep ocean silicic volcano erupted under the waves 5 years ago but hardly anyone noticed. In 2012 the Havre volcano in the Kermradic arc (new Zealand) erupted with rhyolite magma and was only recognised from a pumice raft seen in satellite imagery. Since then mapping, observations, and sampling by submersibles have provided lots of information. The lava came out of at least 14 vents in the ocean floor at depths of 990 and 1220m.