Geology news

Horses and Dragonflies

At https://phys.org/print454252017.html ... a fossil horse foal has been uncovered in Yukatia in Russia - perfectly preserved in the permafrost. It still has its skin, hair and tail/ It is estimated to have died between 30 and 40,000 years ago.

   

Yosemite Granites

This comes from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/06/180627160430.htm ... Yosemite granite tells a different story about Earth's geological history, is the blurb. What do they mean? Granites in Yosemite National Park contain minerals that crystalised at a much lower temperature than previously thought possible. Apparently, this upends our understanding of how granites form - which seems very important (but is it?). Granites are igneous rocks - mainly quartz and feldspar. They are the link between igneous processes within the Earth and volcanic rocks that solidified at the surface.

Super Highway

In Science Reports (August 2018) we have dinosaur tracks found in Alaska - see https://phys.org/print452768549.html ... and now it is proposed Alaska was the gateway to the New World for the dinosaurs (and now where have we heard something like that). This is an interesting idea because if it is true it may indicate the Earth's topography was quite different in the dinosaur era. If Alaska was joined at the hip to Siberia and the Atlantic was much narrower than it is now (as Plate Tectonics might dictate)  what might that imply? A smaller Earth.

Krakatau Big Bang

At https://tallbloke.wordpress.com/2018/08/04/earthquakes-can-systematicall... ... a big earth quake can generate after shocks (or a succession of earthquakes in the same general location) - but it can also generate earthquakes on the opposite of the planet.

Sea Level Fall

At https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-05760-3 ... (25th July 2018)an analysis of ancient coral from the Great Barrier Reef in Australia reveals that global sea levels 'fell rapidly' at the end of the last glacial period. The Late (or Last) Glacial Maximum, is dated t its maximum extent between 26,500 and 19,000 years ago and is often thought to represent a prolonged period when glaciation was at its greatest extent. Apparently, this is contradicted by coral growth and retraction in eastern Australia (we are told).

Holocene Geology

At https://phys.org/print451549404.html ... the Holocene is a blink in the eye of geochronology but this has not stopped the grandees fo the International Union of Geological Sciences from dividing it into 3 sections - each defined as a separate geological period. It probably gives their egos a boost but is it justified as the Holocene is littered with climatic downturns and upticks which they largely pass over. True, they have homed in on two very pronounced climatic episodes (which should have geological parallels that are yet unexplored). Why the divisions?

Child of Krakatau

We've all hear of the devastating Krakatau eruption back in the 19th century when a jet of ash, stones, and smoke shot 12 miles into the sky - and killed 36,000 people. Now, Anat Krakatau, a small volcanic island that emerged from the ocean half a century after the 1883 volcanic eruption has rumbled into life - between Java and Sumatra. See https://wattsupwiththat.com/2018/07/19/worrying-child-of-krakatau-volcan...

Volcanic Twin

At https://phys.org/print450766148.html ... evidence of two volcanoes in Japan connected through a common subterranean magma source.

At https://wattsupwiththat.com/2018/07/16/sound-waves-reveal-huge-cache-of-... ... sound waves appear to show the existence of diamonds 100 miles below the surface of the earth.

Wine and Soils

I can remember attending a talk by a geologist some years ago now which concerned the geology of wine growing - and how soil and geology affected the flavours in the grapes. It was a fascinating talk and we all got to taste a glass of wine - which didn't actually prove anything either way. At https://phys.org/print449227859.html ... apparently Bloomberg has got hold of this idea and popularised the geology of wine - and various media wine writers are in on it as it adds a different dimension to the hype and mystique they can create around different wines (and their flavours).

Rocks and Nitrogen

Sent in by Jovan. At www.scientificamerican.com/article/mystery-of-earths-missing-nitrogen-so... ... mainstream considered nearly all the nitrogen ins soils came directly from the atmosphere, sequestered by microbes and dissolved in rain. Environmentalists, on the other hand, claim nitrogen mainly leaches from farm fields with an origin in nitrogenous fertilisers. However, it would seem there is another important source of nitrogen in soils - and therefore in run off into streams and rivers. Nitrogen that leaks out of rocks.