Missing Dark Matter

28 November 2020
Astronomy

One hard to make up your mind about. Well, that depends of course. A faraway galaxy, we are told, is noted for its absence of dark matter. This seems to have disturbed cosmologists. Why? In the study the existence of dark matter is explained, an otherwise invisible substance or energy. It involves the theory of galaxy formation. New evidence is presented to show 'the galaxy is not really an anomaly – but a victim of theft'. Take your time digestiing that. Instead of being consistent with the consensus theory the authors have had to opt to keep it propped up. It is, apparently, no longer a mystery. Dark matter, they say, a completely unproven 'thing', creates the strong gravity required to spark galaxy formation. However, we have a galaxy that exists, contrary to the consensus model, and that has to be explained by one means or another. It seems that gravitational pull from nearby galaxies or stars may be the culprit. The galaxy in question doesn't conform. It's shape is quite different. It does not seem to be at the mercy of gravitational pull. That is now out of date we are told as the new research paper shows the rogue galaxy, which is rogue because it has a 'relaxed' symmetrical shape  which suggests that no outside force is perturbing it, does in fact suffer from perturbation, from nearby galaxy [s]. The researchers employed telescopes and deep imaging to find 'faint clues' on the outer edge of the rogue galaxy. These are said to show an adverse effect, from its neighbours.

As dark matter is an invisible force it can only be observed via large stellar objects, such as stars and galaxies, and how they interact with space around them. We are then told the deep imaging is very difficult to accomplish, or analyse, as we, or they, are looking at features one thousand times fainter than the darkest sky visible from the surface of the earth.The study is at https://doi.org/10.3847/1538-4357/abc340

 

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