Catastrophism news

Carolina Bays (and similar geological features)

At http://cosmictusk.com/Sand-sheets-from-michigan-davias-presentation-to-a... ... Michael Davias is placing a date around 40,000 years ago on the Carolina Bay formation. George Howard makes the point that no single explanation as yet accounts for all the observed characteristics of the Bays.

Corals and the end of the Ice Age

Coral off Tahiti shows a dramatic and rapid rise in sea level of around 14m at 14,600 years ago - at the onset of the Bolling warm period (following the end of the Oldest Dryas event or Heinrich event number One). A similar thing happened at the end of the Younger Dryas event, it is thought - or something very similar. It is being interpreted as evidence of a major mega-flood event, caused by the rapidly melting ice sheets thought to have existed across the top of the northern hemisphere - see www.physorg.com/print252305308.html.

Jupiter and Ammonia

At www.physorg.com/print252331686.html ... computer simulation of the July of 2009 impact event, picked up by an amateur astronomer the following day, has tried to find out what size and composition of object it would have taken to achieve what was observed the day after it happened. The amateur alerted mainstream astronomers and telescopes were turned to fix on Jupiter - so quite a bit of evidence was in fact accumulated.

Napier vindicated

Following on from yesterday (Bill Napier email from 2005) the YD impact hypothesis is revisited at http://craterhunter.wordpress.com/2012/03/16/the-younger-dryas-impact-hy... in which the author begins by saying the team presenting the YD boundary event were not writing from a solid astronomical model - and that is what got them into trouble with the critics. This was because they were relying on Toon et al and the estimate they made that it would take a 4 mile wide bolide to account for a continent wide debris layer.

Bill Napier 7 years ago

Bill Napier, in an email to the Benny Peiser Cambridge Conference Network in 2005 (in reply to criticism of the Clube and Napier model) said, 'so far as I know nobody of status disputes that there was an erstwhile exceptionally large comet in a short period earth crossing orbit in the relatively recent past. In fact, I don't know how it could be disputed since we see the debris in the form of the old massive Taurid meteor stream.

The YD boundary event ... a solar flare?

This story is a year old but Ive fished it out as it offers an alternative explanation for the Younger Dryas event - see http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2011/06/was-pleistocene-mass-... and is the hypothesis of Paul LaViolette of the Starburst Foundation in a paper published in the journal Radiocarbon (last year). It is interesting in that he notes there were radiocarbon 'spurts' when radiocarbon levels in the atmosphere shot up suddenly in which he attempts to tie in with solar Hale cycles (and the de Vreis 200 year solar cycle period).

The fightback cometh ... all of a quiet

Not CAGW magic tricks this time but the YD boundary impact hypothesis has suddenly made a comeback - in PNAS (see www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1110614109 or http://cosmictusk.com/pnas-evidence-from-central-mexico-supporting-the-Y...). Further articles from new authors on the subject, including scientists from a variety of disciplines, are due to publish shortly, a surprising and unexpected bounce back after all the angst of last year.

Velikovsky Heresies

Gary Gilligan spotted this book for sale on Amazon, see www.amazon.co.uk/Velikovsky-Heresies-Collision-Catastrophes-Revisited/dp... and the product description is as follows .... it provides new evidence from recent space probe missions to support Velikovsky's theories on Venus, presents recently translated ancient texts from China, Korea and Japan that seem to describe a comet like appearance to Venus, and examines evidence of major geomagnetic events in 1500 and 750BC that he claims coincide with close passes of Venus.

An Alaska 'big wave' event at the end of the Pleistocene?

Over at http://cosmictusk.com/alaska-big-wave-at-12900/ there is the claim of a huge tsunami wave at the YD boundary - or thereabouts, with some nice Native American artwork to kick it off. Deposits of sea shell and other oceanic detritus found in the Juneau area stratigraphy seems to have been washed ashore from a wave rather being laid down over time. The consensus opinion seems to be that the area was once beneath the sea - a common geological definition whenever sea creatures are found in what are now land-bound locations.

Clams and African iron smelting

At www.physorg.com/print248086305.html ... clams have been found at hydro-thermal vents in the deep ocean - in the Mariana Trench. This is located in the western Pacific, east of the Mariana Islands and the trench is around 1580 miles in length - a sort of underwater Rift Valley and created, it is thought, by one plate moving beneath another (paper published in PNAS, Feb 9th 2012).